• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Recipes starting with C

Coffee
  • Botanical: Coffea arabica
  • Family: Rubiaceae
  • Known as: Caffea
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, sharp

Coffee

Wild plants grow to between 9 and 12 m (29 and 39 ft) tall, and have an open branching system; the leaves are opposite, simple elliptic-ovate to oblong, 6–12 cm (2.4–4.8 in) long and 4–8 cm (1.6–3.2 in) broad, glossy dark green. The flowers are white, 10–15 mm in diameter and grow in axillary clusters. The fruit is a drupe (though commonly called a "cherry"; the plural form is simply "cherry" - used only when referring to the fruit of C. arabica - when referring to the actual cherry fruit, the appropriate plural is "cherries") 10–15 mm in diameter, maturing bright red to purple and typically contains two seeds (the coffee seeds).

Coltsfoot
  • Botanical: Tussilago farfara
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Huflattich, Coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara, Horsehoof, Coughwort, Fieldhove, Bullsfoot, Cleats, Clayweed, Tusilago
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot is a perennial herbaceous plant that spreads by seeds and rhizomes. Tussilago is often found in colonies of dozens of plants. The flowers, which superficially resemble dandelions, appear in early spring before dandelions appear. The leaves, which resemble a colt's foot in cross section, do not appear usually until after the seeds are set. Thus, the flowers appear on stems with no apparent leaves, and the later appearing leaves then wither and die during the season without seeming to set flowers. The plant is typically 10–30 cm in height.

Comfrey
  • Botanical: Symphytum officinale
  • Family: Boraginaceae
  • Known as: Arznei-Beinwell, Beinwurz, Bienenkraut, Echter Beinwell, Gemeiner Beinwell, Gemeine Wallwurz, Gewöhnlicher Beinwell, Glotwurzel, Grosse Wallwurz, Hasenbrot, Hasenlaub, Himmelsbrot, Honigblum, Komfrei, Kuchenkraut, Milchwurz, Schadheilwurzel, Schmalwurz
  • Old Use: medicinal

Comfrey

The leafy stem, 2 to 3 feet high, is stout, angular and hollow, broadly winged at the top and covered with bristly hairs. The lower, radical leaves are very large, up to 10 inches long, ovate in shape and covered with rough hairs which promote itching when touched. The stem-leaves are decurrent, i.e. a portion of them runs down the stem, the body of the leaf being continued beyond its base and point of attachment with the stem. They decrease in size the higher they grow up the stem, which is much branched above and terminated by one-sided clusters of drooping flowers, either creamy yellow, or purple, growing on short stalks.

Copaiba
  • Botanical: Copaifera officinalis
  • Family: Leguminosae
  • Known as: Copaiva. Balsam Copaiba. Copaiba officinalis.
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: balsamic

Copaiba

Copaifera Officinalis (copaiba) is a well branched tropical tree that grows up to 100 feet tall. It has pinnate leathery leaves and blossoms are borne in whitish racemes; the flowers are white, small and aromatic. The fruit is a coriaceous legume containing only a single seed. The part of the copaiba tree that is used is the oleoresin (a clear yellow resin) accumulated in cavities within the trunk; it is obtained by making incisions in the tree trunk. Although this resin is referred to as a balsam, in reality it is more a natural oil; thick clear pale - to golden yellow color

Coriander
  • Botanical: Coriandrum sativum
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Coriander, Koriander, Arabische Petersilie, Asiatische Petersilie, Chinesische Petersilie, Gartenkoriander, Gebauter Koriander, Gewürzkoriander, Indische Petersilie, Kaliander, Klanner, Schwindelkorn, Schwindelkraut, Stinkdill, Wandläusekraut, Wanzendill
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fruity, herbaceius, spicy, sweet, warm

Coriander

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Coriander is native to regions spanning from southern Europe and North Africa to southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems.

Cork Oak
  • Botanical: Quercus suber
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • Known as: Korkeiche, Sorbriero
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: sweet

Cork Oak

It grows to up to 20 m (66 ft), although it is typically more stunted in its native environment. The leaves are 4 to 7 cm (1.6 to 2.8 in) long, weakly lobed or coarsely toothed, dark green above, paler beneath, with the leaf margins often downcurved. The acorns are 2 to 3 cm (0.79 to 1.18 in) long, in a deep cup fringed with elongated scales.

Corkwood
  • Botanical: Duboisia myoporoides
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Known as: Duboisia
  • Old Use: medical

Corkwood

It is a shrub or tree. It has a thick and corky bark.[1] The leaves are obovate to elliptic in shape, 4–15 cm long and 1–4 cm wide. The small white flowers are produced in clusters. This is followed by globose purple-black berries (not edible).

Corn
  • Botanical: Zea mays
  • Family: Poaceae
  • Known as: Maize, Mais,
  • Old Use: culinary
  • Aroma: earthy, oriental

Corn

A monoecious plant. Male flowers in terminal racemes; spikelets, two-flowered glumes nearly equal, herbaceous, terminating in two sharp points; females, axillary in the sheaths of the leaves.

The spikes or ears proceed from the stalls at various distances from the ground, and are closely enveloped in several thin leaves, forming a sheath called the husk; the ears consist of a cylindrical substance, a pith called the cob; on this the seeds are ranged in eight rows, each row having thirty or more seeds.

Couch Grass
  • Botanical: Agropyron repens
  • Family: Poaceae
  • Known as: Elymus repens, twitch, quick grass, quitch grass, dog grass, quackgrass, scutch grass, and witchgrass, Kriech-Quecke, Gemeine Quecke, Gewöhnliche Quecke, einfach Quecke
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: earthy

Couch Grass

Couch grass ( A. repens ) is a weed that is widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere. The grass grows up to 1.5 m tall with spikes up to 15 cm long containing many flowered spikelets. The leaves alternate with sheaths, the blades are long and narrow, and the veins are parallel. The grass also possesses shiny, pale yellow, hollow rhizomes and longitudinally grooved stems that are 2 to 3 mm thick. Thin roots and short fiber-like cataphylls are present at the unthickened nodes. Couch grass has an almost bland but slightly sweet taste. The rhizomes, roots, and stems are used to formulate the product. 

Cowbane
  • Botanical: Cicuta virosa
  • Family: Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
  • Known as: Northern Water Hemlock, Wasserschierling, Wüterich
  • Aroma: fresh

Cowbane

Hemlock is a tall, much branched and gracefully growing plant, with elegantly-cut foliage and white flowers.

It is a biennial plant, usually growing from 2 to 4 feet high, but in sheltered situations sometimes attaining nearly double that height. The root is long, forked, pale yellow and 1/2 to 3/4 inch in diameter. The erect, smooth stem, stout below, much branched above and hollow, is bright green, but is distinctively mottled with small irregular stains or spots of a port-wine colour and also covered with a white 'bloom' which is very easily rubbed off.

The leaves are numerous, those of the first year and the lower ones very large, even reaching 2 feet in length, alternate, longstalked, tripinnate. The upper leaves are much smaller, nearly stalkless, with the short footstalk dilated and stem-clasping, often opposite or three together, more oblong in outline, dipinnate or pinnate, quite smooth, uniform dull green, segments toothed, each tooth being tipped with a minute, sharp white point.

The umbels are rather small, 1 1/4 to 2 inches broad, numerous, terminal, on rather short flower stalks, with 12 to 16 rays to the umbel. At the base of the main umbel there are 4 to 8 lance-shaped, deflexed bracts; at the base of the small umbels there are three or four spreading bractlets.

The flowers are small, their petals white with an inflexed point, the stamens a little longer than the petals, with white anthers.

The fruit is small, about 1/8 inch long broad, ridged, compressed laterally and smooth. Both flowers and fruit bear a resemblance to caraway, but the prominent crenate (wavy) ridges and absence of vittae (oil cells between the ridges) are important characters for distinguishing this fruit from others of the same natural order of plants.

 

Creole cotton
  • Botanical: Gossypium barbadense
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Sea Island Cotton; Egyptian cotton; Gossypium barbadense L.; sea-island cotton
  • Old Use: medical, industry
  • Aroma: herbaceius, spicy

Creole cotton

Subshrubs or shrubs, perennial, 2-3 m tall, hairy or only hairy on petiole and veins on abaxial surface. Branchlets dark purple, angular. Stipules lanceolate-falcate, ca. 10 mm, usually caducous; petiole longer than leaf blade, with black glandular spots; leaf blade 3-5-lobed, 7-12 cm in diam., lobes ovate, oblong, oblong-lanceolate, or obovate, more than 1/2 as long as blade, central lobe longer, lateral lobes usually extending, base cordate, apex long acuminate. Flowers terminal or axillary. Pedicel usually shorter than petiole, stellate villous, with black glandular spots. Epicalyx lobes 5 or more, free, broadly ovate, 3.5-5 cm, base rounded-cordate, 10-15-toothed, teeth 3-4 × as long as wide. Calyx cup-shaped, truncate, with black glandular spots. Corolla pale yellow, purple or crimson in center, funnelform; petals 5-8 cm, stellate villous abaxially. Staminal column 3.5-4 cm, glabrous; filaments closely appressed, upper ones longer. Capsule 3(or 4)-celled, oblong to oblong-ovoid, 3-7 cm, with obvious glandular spots abaxially, base larger, apex acute to beaked. Seeds black and smooth when hair fallen, free or aggregated, ovoid, ca. 8 mm, beaked, with white wool and easily detached short fuzz on one or both tips.

Cubeb
  • Botanical: Piper cubeba
  • Family: Piperaceae
  • Known as: Tailed Pepper, Shital Chini, Kabab Chini, Java Pepper, Kubeben Pfeffer, Schwanz Pfeffer

Cubeb

Cubeb (Piper cubeba) is a plant in genus Piper, cultivated for its fruit and essential oil.

The fruits are gathered before they are ripe, and carefully dried.

Commercial cubebs consist of the dried berries, similar in appearance to black pepper, but with stalks attached – the "tails" in "tailed pepper".

The dried pericarp is wrinkled, and its color ranges from grayish-brown to black.

The seed is hard, white and oily. 

Cumin
  • Botanical: Cuminum cyminum
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Cumin Acre, Sweet Cumin, Anise Acre.
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy

Cumin

Its stem is slender and branched, rarely exceeding 1 foot in height and somewhat angular. The leaves are divided into long, narrow segments like Fennel, but much smaller and are of a deep green colour, generally turned back at the ends. The upper leaves are nearly stalkless, but the lower ones have longer leaf-stalks.