• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Recipes starting with D

Dandelion
  • Botanical: Taraxacum officinale
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Löwenzahn, Gemeiner Löwenzahn,
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Dandelion

Taraxacum officinale grows from generally unbranched taproots and produces one to more than ten stems that are typically 5 to 40 cm tall, but sometimes up to 70 cm tall. The stems can be tinted purplish, they are upright or lax, and produce flower heads that are held as tall or taller than the foliage. The foliage may be upright-growing or horizontally spreading; the leaves have petioles that are either unwinged or narrowly winged.

Dipterocarpus
  • Botanical: Dipterocarpus retusus
  • Family: Dipterocarpaceae
  • Known as: Zweiflügelfruchtbäume, Zweiflügelnüsse, Flügelfruchtbäume
  • Old Use: medical, manufacturing

Dipterocarpus

he tree, some 20-30m tall, is found in Cambodia in dense forests of the plains, common on hillsides and along rivers and in forests between 800m and 1500m altitude

Dragons Blood
  • Botanical: Calamus draco
  • Family: Palmaceae
  • Known as: Calamus Draco. Draconis Resina. Sanguis draconis. Dragon's Blood Palm. Blume.
  • Old Use: medical, industry
  • Aroma: sweet

Dragons Blood

-Dragon's Blood, as known in commerce, has several origins, the substance so named being contributed by widely differing species. Probably the best known is that from Sumatra. Daemomorops Draco formerly known as Calamus Draco, was transferred with many others of the species to Daemomorops, the chief distinguishing mark being the placing of the flowers along the branches instead of their being gathered into catkins, as in those remaining under Calamus. The long, slender stems of the genus are flexible, and the older trees develop climbing propensities. The leaves have prickly stalks which often grow into long tails and the bark is provided with many hundreds of flattened spines. The berries are about the size of a cherry, and pointed. When ripe they are covered with a reddish, resinous substance which is separated in several ways, the most satisfactory being by steaming, or by shaking or rubbing in coarse, canvas bags. An inferior kind is obtained by boiling the fruits to obtain a decoction after they have undergone the second process. The product may come to market in beads, joined as if forming a necklace, and covered with leaves (Tear Dragon's Blood), or in small, round sticks about 18 inches long, packed in leaves and strips of cane. Other varieties are found in irregular lumps, or in a reddish powder. They are known as lump, stick, reed, tear, or saucer Dragon's Blood.