• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Recipes starting with M

Malva
  • Botanical: Malva sylvestris
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Mallow, High Mallow, Malva, Malve, Käsepappel, Gänsepappel, Kasköpfe, Käslein, Katzenkrallen, Krallenblumen, Pappeln, Schafkas, Schwellkraut
  • Old Use: medicinal
  • Aroma: earthy, herbaceius

Malva

Malva sylvestris is a spreading herb, which is an annual in North Africa, biennial in the Mediterranean and a perennial elsewhere. Three feet (one meter) tall, (3 meters has been observed in a wild or escaped from cultivation setting, and several cultivated plants of 2 meter or more in height) with a growth habit which can be straight or decumbent, branched and covered with fine soft hairs or none at all, M. sylvestris is pleasing in appearance when it first starts to flower, but as the summer advances, "the leaves lose their deep green color and the stems assume a ragged appearance".

Manna Ash
  • Botanical: Fraxinus ornus
  • Family: Oleaceae
  • Known as: Flowering Ash, South European flowering ash
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sweet

Manna Ash

Fraxinus ornus is a medium-sized deciduous tree growing to 15–25 m tall with a trunk up to 1 m diameter. The bark is dark grey, remaining smooth even on old trees. The buds are pale pinkish-brown to grey-brown, with a dense covering of short grey hairs. The leaves are in opposite pairs, pinnate, 20–30 cm long, with 5-9 leaflets; the leaflets are broad ovoid, 5–10 cm long and 2–4 cm broad, with a finely serrated and wavy margin, and short but distinct petiolules 5–15 mm long; the autumn colour is variable, yellow to purplish. The flowers are produced in dense panicles 10–20 cm long after the new leaves appear in late spring, each flower with four slender creamy white petals 5–6 mm long; they are pollinated by insects. The fruit is a slender samara 1.5-2.5 cm long, the seed 2 mm broad and the wing 4–5 mm broad, green ripening brown.

Masterwort
  • Botanical: Imperatoria ostruthium
  • Family: Apiaceae or Umbelliferae
  • Known as: Peucedanum ostruthium, Masterwort, Peucedanum ostruthium, Meisterwurz,
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sharp, spicy

Masterwort

A smooth, perennial plant, the stout, furrowed stem growing 2 to 3 feet high. The dark-green leaves, which somewhat resemble those of Angelica, are on very long foot-stalks and are divided into `three leaflets, each of which is often again sub-divided into three. The umbels of flowers are large and many-rayed, the corollas white; the fruit has very broad wings.

Mastic Tree
  • Botanical: Pistacia lentiscus
  • Family: Pistaciaceae
  • Known as: Mastixstrauch, Wilde Pistazie
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: resinous, smoky

Mastic Tree

A shrub rarely growing higher than 12 feet. The best Mastic occurs in roundish tears about the size of a small pea, or in flattened, irregular pear-shaped, or oblong pieces covered with a whitish powder. They are pale yellow in colour, which darkens with age. The odour is agreeable and the taste mild and resinous, and when chewed it becomes soft, so that it can easily be masticated. This characteristic enables it to be distinguished froma resin called Sanderach, which it resembles, but which when bitten breaks to powder.

  • Botanical: Piper aduncum
  • Family: Piperaceae
  • Known as: Higuillo de hoja menuda, Gebogener Pfeffer
  • Old Use: medical, culinary
  • Aroma: spicy

Matico

Matico is a tropical, evergreen, shrubby tree that grows to the height of 6 to 7 meter (20 to 23 ft) with lance-shaped leaves that are 12 to 20 centimeter (5 to 8 in) long. 

Mayapple
  • Botanical: Podophyllum peltatum
  • Family: Berberidaceae
  • Known as: hogapple, Indian apple, mayflower, umbrella plant, wild lemon, wild mandrake, American mandrake, devil's apple, Schildförmiges Fußblatt, Maiapfel, Entenfuß, Amerikanischer Maiapfel
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: exotic

Mayapple

Mayapples are woodland plants, typically growing in colonies derived from a single root. The stems grow to 30–40 cm tall, with palmately lobed umbrella-like leaves up to 20–40 cm diameter with 3–9 shallowly to deeply cut lobes. The plants produce several stems from a creeping underground rhizome; some stems bear a single leaf and do not produce any flower or fruit, while flowering stems produce a pair or more leaves with 1–8 flowers in the axil between the apical leaves. The flowers are white, yellow or red, 2–6 cm diameter with 6–9 petals, and mature into a green, yellow or red fleshy fruit 2–5 cm long.

Melissa
  • Botanical: Melissa officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Zitronenmelisse, Melissa, Lemon balm, melissa_officinalis
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Melissa

Melissa Officinalis is a perennial herb from the Lamiaceae (mint) family, which just happens to be the same family as Salvia Divinorum. This herb can grow to be 3 feet (1 meter) tall, and 3 feet (1 meter) wide. The leaves are fuzzy with many tiny hairs, they vary in shape from oblong oval to a heart shape and all have a jagged toothed edge.

Mezereon
  • Botanical: Daphne mezereum
  • Family: Thymelaeaceae
  • Known as: February daphne, mezereon, mezereum, spurge laurel or spurge olive
  • Old Use: medical, industry

Mezereon

It is a deciduous shrub growing to 1.5 m tall. The leaves are soft, 3–8 cm long and 1–2 cm broad, arranged spirally on the stems. The flowers are produced in early spring on the bare stems before the leaves appear. They have a four-lobed pink or light purple (rarely white) perianth 10–15 mm diameter, and are strongly scented. The fruit is a bright red berry 7–12 mm diameter; it is very poisonous for people, though fruit-eating birds like thrushes are immune and eat them, dispersing the seeds in their droppings.

Military Orchid
  • Botanical: Orchis militaris
  • Family: Orchidaceae
  • Known as: Helm-Knabenkraut, Salep. Saloop. Sahlep. Satyrion. Levant Salep.
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sweet

Military Orchid

This plant grows to a height of 20 to 50 cm with a robust stem with rather drawn up oblong basal leaves. The inflorescence forms a purplish dense cone consisting of from 10 to 40 flowers. In each flower the sepals and side petals are gathered together to form a pointed "helmet" (whence it gets its name), a lilac colour outside and a veined purple colour inside. The central tongue finishes in two lobes separated by a tooth.

Mistletoe
  • Botanical: Viscum album
  • Family: Santalaceae
  • Known as: Mistletoe, Viscum album, European Mistletoe, Common Mistletoe, Mistel, Affalter, Albranken, Birnäpsel, Bocksfutter, Donarbesen, Donnerbeseb, Drudenfuss, Geisskraut, Heil aller Schäden, Heiligkreuzholz, Hexenbesen, Hexenchrut, Hexennest, Immergrün, Kenster
  • Old Use: ceremonial use

Mistletoe

The stem is yellowish and smooth, freely forked, separating when dead into bone-like joints. The leaves are tongue-shaped, broader towards the end, 1 to 3 inches long, very thick and leathery, of a dull yellow-green colour, arranged in pairs, with very short footstalks. The flowers, small and inconspicuous, are arranged in threes, in close short spikes or clusters in the forks of the branches, and are of two varieties, the male and female occurring on different plants. Neither male nor female flowers have a corolla, the parts of the fructification springing from the yellowish calyx.

Monkshood
  • Botanical: Aconitum napellus
  • Family: Ranunculaceae
  • Known as: aconite, wolfsbane, fuzi, monk's blood
  • Old Use: In Chinese medicine processed aconite was used to treat heart failure and other heart diseases.

Monkshood

It is an herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1 m tall, with hairless stems and leaves. The leaves are rounded, 5–10 cm diameter, palmately divided into five to seven deeply lobed segments. The flowers are dark purple to bluish-purple, narrow oblong helmet-shaped, 1–2 cm tall.

Monkshood
  • Botanical: Aconitum ferox
  • Family: Ranunculaceae
  • Known as: Aconitum virorum, Indian aconite, Eisenhut, Sturmhut, Akonit, Wolfswurz

Monkshood

The plant is a hardy perennial, with a fleshy, spindle-shaped root, palecoloured when young, but subsequently acquiring a dark brown skin.

The stem is about 3 feet high, with dark green, glossy leaves, deeply divided in palmate manner and flowers in erect clusters of a dark blue colour.

The shape of the flower is specially designed to attract and utilize bee visitors, especially the humble bee. The sepals are purple - purple being specially attractive to bees - and are fancifully shaped, one of them being in the form of a hood. The petals are only represented by the two very curious nectaries within the hood, somewhat in the form of a hammer; the stamens are numerous and lie depressed in a bunch at the mouth of the flower. They are pendulous at first, but rise in succession and place their anthers forward in such a way that a bee visiting the flower for nectar is dusted with the pollen, which he then carries to the next flower he visits and thereby fertilizes the undeveloped fruits, which are in a tuft in the centre of the stamens, each carpel containing a single seed.

 

Mullein Orange
  • Botanical: Verbascum phlomoides
  • Family: Scrophulariaceae
  • Known as: Verbascum thapsiforme, Königskerze

Mullein Orange

They are biennial or perennial plants, rarely annuals or subshrubs, growing to 0.5–3 m tall. The plants first form a dense rosette of leaves at ground level, subsequently sending up a tall flowering stem. Biennial plants form the rosette the first year and the stem the following season. The leaves are spirally arranged, often densely hairy, though glabrous (hairless) in some species. The flowers have five symmetrical petals; petal colours in different species include yellow (most common), orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous minute seeds.

Mustard Black
  • Botanical: Brassica nigra
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Black Mustard, Brassica nigra, Sinapis nigra, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard Black

Brassica nigra is a ANNUAL growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in). It grows from two to eight feet tall, with racemes of small yellow flowers. These flowers are usually up to 1/3" across, with four petals each. The leaves are covered in small hairs; they can wilt on hot days, but recover at night.
 It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.The plant is self-fertile.

Mustard India
  • Botanical: Brassica juncea
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Indian Mustard, Brassica juncea, Mustard Greens, Chinese mustard, Braune Senf, Indischer Senf, Sareptasenf, Ruten-Kohl, Chinesischer Senf
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard India

It is an erect annual, 3 feet or more in height, with smaller flowers than the White Mustard. The spear-shaped, upper leaves, linear, pointed, entire and smooth, and the shortly-beaked pods, readily distinguish it from the former species. The smooth, erect flattened pods, each provided with a short slender beak, contain about ten to twelve dark reddish-brown or black seeds, which are collected when ripe and dried.