• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Fabaceae

Cassia
  • Botanical: Cinnamomum aromaticum
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: Cassia, Chinese cinnamon, Zimtkassie,
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: oriental, spicy, sweet

Cassia

The cultivated trees are kept as coppices, and numerous shoots, which are not allowed to rise higher than 10 feet, spring from the roots. Their appearance when the flame-coloured leaves and delicate blossoms first appear is very beautiful. The fruit is about the size of a small olive. The leaves are evergreen, ovaloblong blades from 5 to 9 inches long. The trees are at their greatest perfection at the age of ten to twelve years, but they continue to spread and send up new shoots. The bark may be easily distinguished from that of cinnamon, as it is thicker, coarser, darker, and duller, the flavour being more pungent, less sweet and delicate, and slightly bitter.

Clover Yellow Sweet
  • Botanical: Melilotus officinalis
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Yellow Sweet Clover, Yellow Melilot, Ribbed Melilot, Common Melilot, Bärenklee, Mottenklee, Melilotenklee, Goldklee, Schotenklee, Mottenkraut
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Clover Yellow Sweet

The Meliots are perennial herbs, 2 to 4 feet high, found in dry fields and along roadsides, in waste places and chalky banks, especially along railway banks and near lime kilns. The smooth, erect stems are much branched, the leaves placed on alternate sides of the stems are smooth and trifoliate, the leaflets oval. The plants bear long racemes of small, sweet-scented, yellow or white, papilionaceous flowers in the yellow species, the keel of the flower much shorter than the other parts and containing much honey.

Gum Arabic
  • Botanical: Acacia senegal
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: acacia gum, chaar gund, char goond, meska
  • Old Use: culinary use; production of ink

Gum Arabic

Acacia senegal is a low branching shrub or small tree to 7 m high (maximum 15 m). The tree flowers during the rainy season and loses its leaves during the dry season. When water is only available at great depth, deeply penetrating tap roots can develop, and the tree will grow considerably larger than normal.

Liquorice
  • Botanical: Glycyrrhiza glabra
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Licorice, Lakritze, Süßholz
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: sweet

Liquorice

It is a herbaceous perennial, growing to 1 m in height, with pinnate leaves about 7–15 cm (3–6 in) long, with 9–17 leaflets. The flowers are 0.8–1.2 cm (1/3 to 1/2 in) long, purple to pale whitish blue, produced in a loose inflorescence. The fruit is an oblong pod, 2–3 cm (1 in) long, containing several seeds. The roots are stoloniferous.

Peanut
  • Botanical: Arachis hypogaea
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: groundnut, earthnuts, ground nuts, goober peas, monkey nuts, pygmy nuts, pig nuts, Erdnuss, Aschantinuss, Arachisnuss, Kamerunnuss
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: oriental, woody

Peanut

It is an annual herbaceous plant growing 30 to 50 cm (1.0 to 1.6 ft) tall. The leaves are opposite, pinnate with four leaflets (two opposite pairs; no terminal leaflet); each leaflet is 1 to 7 cm (⅜ to 2¾ in) long and 1 to 3 cm (⅜ to 1 inch) across. The flowers are a typical peaflower in shape, 2 to 4 cm (0.8 to 1.6 in) (¾ to 1½ in) across, yellow with reddish veining. The specific name, hypogaea means "under the earth"; after pollination, the flower stalk elongates, causing it to bend until the ovary touches the ground. Continued stalk growth then pushes the ovary underground where the mature fruit develops into a legume pod, the peanut – a classical example of geocarpy. Pods are 3 to 7 cm (1.2 to 2.8 in) long, containing 1 to 4 seeds.

Peru Balsam
  • Botanical: Myroxylon balsamum
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Peru Balsam, Tolu Balsam, Myroxylon balsamum, Balsam of Tolu, Balsam of Peru, Myroxylon, Perubalsam, Balsambäume, Cabreúva, Cabreuva, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Quina, Balsamo
  • Old Use: medicinal, culinary; flavoring
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy, sweet, warm

Peru Balsam

The trees are large, growing to 40 metres (130 ft) tall, with evergreen pinnate leaves 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, with 5–13 leaflets. The flowers are white with yellow stamens, produced in racemes. The fruit is a pod 7–11 centimetres (2.8–4.3 in) long, containing a single seed.

The wood is dark brown, with a deep red heartwood. Natural oils grant it excellent decay resistance. In fact, it is also resistant to preservative treatment. Its specific gravity is 0.74 to 0.81.

Sandalwood Red
  • Botanical: Pterocarpus santalinus
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Pterocarpus santalinus, Red Sanders, Red Sandalwood, Rakta chandana, Sandelholz, Santelholz, Santalholz, lignum santalinum, lignum santali, bois de santal
  • Old Use: medicinal

Sandalwood Red

A small tree 20 to 30 feet high, with many opposite slender drooping branches, bark smooth grey-brown. Young twigs glabrous; leaves opposite, without stipules, petiole slender, about 1/2 inch long, blade 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches long, oval, ovate-oval or lanceolate, acute or obtuse at apex, tapering at base into petiole entire, smooth on both sides, glaucous beneath.

Senna Alexandrian
  • Botanical: Senna alexandrina
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Cassia lanceolata, Egyptian Senna, Tinnevelly Senna, East Indian Senna, séné de la palthe, Alexandrinische Senna
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sweet

Senna Alexandrian

Alexandrian Senna is a shrubby plant that reaches 0.5–1, rarely two, metres in height with a branched, pale-green erect stem and long spreading branches bearing four or five pairs of leaves. These leaves form complex, feathery, mutual pairs. The leaflets vary from 4 to 6 pairs, fully edged, with a sharp top. The midribs are equally divided at the base of the leaflets. The flowers are in a raceme interior[verification needed] blossoms, big in size, coloured yellow that tends to brown. Its legume fruit are horned, broadly oblong, compressed and flat and contain about six seeds.

Tolu Balsam
  • Botanical: Myroxylon balsamum
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Tolu Balsam, Myroxylon balsamum, Balsam of Tolu, Balsam of Peru, Myroxylon, Perubalsam, Balsambäume, Cabreúva, Cabreuva, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Quina, Balsamo
  • Old Use: medicinal, culinary
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy, sweet, warm

Tolu Balsam

The trees are large, growing to 40 metres (130 ft) tall, with evergreen pinnate leaves 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, with 5–13 leaflets. The flowers are white with yellow stamens, produced in racemes. The fruit is a pod 7–11 centimetres (2.8–4.3 in) long, containing a single seed.

The wood is dark brown, with a deep red heartwood. Natural oils grant it excellent decay resistance. In fact, it is also resistant to preservative treatment. Its specific gravity is 0.74 to 0.81.

Vijayasar
  • Botanical: Pterocarpus marsupium
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Malabar Kino, Indian Kino Tree, Benga, Bijiayasal, Piasal, Venkai
  • Old Use: medical, industry
  • Aroma: sharp

Vijayasar

It is of moderate size to large tree. The height ranges from 15 to 30 meters. The stem is stout and crooked with widely spreading branches. The bark is thick and dark brown to grey in colour. Leaves are compound and imparipinnate. Leaflets are 5-7, coriaceous, oblong, obtuse, emarginated or even bilobed at the apex and glabrous on both surfaces. The petioles are round, smooth and waved from leaflet to leaflet, 5 or 6 inches long and there are no stipules. Panicles are terminal and very large; ramifications are bifarious, like the leaves. Peduncles and pedicals are round and a little downy. Bracts are small, caduceus, solitary below each division and subdivision of the panicle. The flowers are very numerous, white, with a small tinge of yellow. Vexillum is with a long, slender claw, very broad; sides reflexed, waved, curled and veined; keel is two pettled, adhering slightly for a little way near the middle, waved, etc., same as the vexillum. Stamens are 10, united near the base, but soon dividing into two parcels of 5 each; anthers are globose and 2-lobed. Ovary is oblong, pedicelled, hairy, generally 2-celled; cells are transverse and 1­seeded. Style is ascending. The legume, which is borne on a long petiole, is three-fourths orbicular, the upper remainder, which extends from the pedicel to the remainder of the style, is straight, the whole surrounded with a waved, veiny, downy, membraneous wing, swelled, rugose, woody in the center, where the seed is lodged and not opening; generally one but sometimes 2-celled. Seeds are single and reniform