• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Plant

Chamomile Roman
  • Botanical: Chamaemelum nobile L.
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Roman Chamomile, Kamille, Chamaemelum nobile

Chamomile Roman

Chamaemelum nobile has daisy-like white flowers and procumbent stems; the leaves are alternate, bipinnate, finely dissected, and downy to glabrous. The solitary, terminal flowerheads, rising 8-12 in above the ground, consist of prominent yellow disk flowers and silver-white ray flowers. The flowering time is June and July, and its fragrance is sweet, crisp, fruity and herbaceous.

Chamomile Stinking
  • Botanical: Anthemis cotula
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Chamomile, Kamille, Matricaria chamomilla, German chamomile

Chamomile Stinking

Anthemis cotula is an annual glandular plant with a harsh taste and an acrid smell. Its height varies from 12 inches (28 centimeters) to 24 inches (56 centimeters).
The leaves of the plant sometimes have very fine and soft hairs on the upper surface, although the plant is mostly hairless. There is no leaf stalk; leaves grow immediately from the stems. The leaves are pinnate in shape, with many extremely thin lobes, and can be around 1 or 2 inches long (2.5 to 5 centimeters).

Cherry Sour
  • Botanical: Prunus cerasus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Known as: Cherry, Vogelkirsche, Süsskirsche, Sauerkirsche, Weichselkirsche, Morellen

Cherry Sour

The tree is smaller than the sweet cherry (growing to a height of 4–10 m), has twiggy branches, and its crimson-to-near-black cherries are borne upon shorter stalks.

The leaves near the base of the stem are large and numerous, 6 to 8 inches long and 2 to 2 1/2 inches broad, but become smaller as they ascend the stem, on which they are arranged not opposite to one another, but on alternate sides.

Chestnut
  • Botanical: Castanea sativa
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • Known as: Castanea vesca, Castanea vulgaris, Sweet chestnut, Maroni, Marone, Esskastanie, Essbare Kastanie, Echte Kastanie, Cheste, Cheschtene, Keschte, Edelkastanie

Chestnut

C. sativa attains a height of 20–35 m (66–115 ft) with a trunk often 2 m (7 ft) in diameter. The bark often has a net-shaped (retiform) pattern with deep furrows or fissures running spirally in both directions up the trunk. The oblong-lanceolate, boldly toothed leaves are 16–28 cm (6–11 in) long and 5–9 cm (2–4 in) broad.

Cinnamon
  • Botanical: Cinnamomum verum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: Cinnamon, Zimt, Ceylon Zimt, Kanel
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: oriental, spicy, sweet

Cinnamon

Cinnamomum verum trees are 10–15 metres (32.8–49.2 feet) tall. The leaves are ovate-oblong in shape, 7–18 cm (2.75–7.1 inches) long. The flowers, which are arranged in panicles, have a greenish color, and have a distinct odor. The fruit is a purple 1-cm drupe containing a single seed

Clove
  • Botanical: Syzygium aromaticum, Caryophyllus aromaticus
  • Family: Myrtaceae
  • Known as: Cloves, Gewürznelken, Negelken, Nägelein
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: spicy, smoky, sweet

Clove

The clove tree is an evergreen that grows up to 8–12 m tall, with large leaves and sanguine flowers grouped in terminal clusters. The flower buds initially have a pale hue, gradually turn green, then transition to a bright red when ready for harvest. Cloves are harvested at 1.5–2.0 cm long, and consist of a long calyx that terminates in four spreading sepals, and four unopened petals that form a small central ball.

Clover Yellow Sweet
  • Botanical: Melilotus officinalis
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Yellow Sweet Clover, Yellow Melilot, Ribbed Melilot, Common Melilot, Bärenklee, Mottenklee, Melilotenklee, Goldklee, Schotenklee, Mottenkraut
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Clover Yellow Sweet

The Meliots are perennial herbs, 2 to 4 feet high, found in dry fields and along roadsides, in waste places and chalky banks, especially along railway banks and near lime kilns. The smooth, erect stems are much branched, the leaves placed on alternate sides of the stems are smooth and trifoliate, the leaflets oval. The plants bear long racemes of small, sweet-scented, yellow or white, papilionaceous flowers in the yellow species, the keel of the flower much shorter than the other parts and containing much honey.

Clubmoss
  • Botanical: Lycopodium clavatum
  • Family: Lycopodiaceae
  • Known as: Keulen-Bärlapp, Wolfsklaue, Drudenfuss, Denkraut, Gichtmoss, Hexenkraut, Teufelsklauen, Weingrün, Wolfsranke
  • Old Use: The spores of this moss, "lycopodium powder", are explosive if present in the air in high enough densities. They were used as flash powder in early photography an magic acts.

Clubmoss

It is a spore-bearing vascular plant, growing mainly prostrate along the ground with stems up to 1 m long; the stems are much branched, and densely clothed with small, spirally arranged leaves. The leaves are 3–5 mm long and 0.7–1 mm broad, tapered to a fine hair-like white point. The branches bearing spore cones turn erect, reaching 5–15 cm above ground, and have fewer leaves than the horizontal branches. The spore cones are yellow-green, 2–3 cm long, and 5 mm broad. The horizontal stems produce roots at frequent intervals along their length, allowing the stem to grow indefinitely along the ground. The stems superficially resemble small seedlings of coniferous trees, though it is not related to these.

Coca
  • Botanical: Erythroxylum coca
  • Family: Erythroxylaceae
  • Known as: Cuca. Cocaine.

Coca

Small shrubby tree 12 to 18 feet high in the wild state and kept down to about 6 feet when cultivated. Grown from seeds and requires moisture and an equable temperature. Starts yielding in eighteen months and often productive over fifty years. There are two varieties in commerce, the Huanuco Coca, or Erythroxylon Coca, which comes from Bolivia and has leaves of a brownish-green colour, oval, entire and glabrous, with a rather bitter taste, and Peruvian Coca, the leaves of which are much smaller and a pale-green colour.

Coconut
  • Botanical: Cocos nucifera
  • Family: Arecaceae
  • Known as: Cocoanut, Coconut Palm,
  • Aroma: exotic

Coconut

Cocos nucifera is a large palm, growing up to 30 m (98 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves 4–6 m (13–20 ft) long, and pinnae 60–90 cm long; old leaves break away cleanly, leaving the trunk smooth. Coconuts are generally classified into two general types: tall and dwarf. On very fertile land, a tall coconut palm tree can yield up to 75 fruits per year, but more often yields less than 30, mainly due to poor cultural practices. In recent years, improvements in cultivation practices and breeding have produced coconut trees that can yield more.

Coffee
  • Botanical: Coffea arabica
  • Family: Rubiaceae
  • Known as: Caffea
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, sharp

Coffee

Wild plants grow to between 9 and 12 m (29 and 39 ft) tall, and have an open branching system; the leaves are opposite, simple elliptic-ovate to oblong, 6–12 cm (2.4–4.8 in) long and 4–8 cm (1.6–3.2 in) broad, glossy dark green. The flowers are white, 10–15 mm in diameter and grow in axillary clusters. The fruit is a drupe (though commonly called a "cherry"; the plural form is simply "cherry" - used only when referring to the fruit of C. arabica - when referring to the actual cherry fruit, the appropriate plural is "cherries") 10–15 mm in diameter, maturing bright red to purple and typically contains two seeds (the coffee seeds).

Coltsfoot
  • Botanical: Tussilago farfara
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Huflattich, Coltsfoot, Tussilago farfara, Horsehoof, Coughwort, Fieldhove, Bullsfoot, Cleats, Clayweed, Tusilago
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Coltsfoot

Coltsfoot is a perennial herbaceous plant that spreads by seeds and rhizomes. Tussilago is often found in colonies of dozens of plants. The flowers, which superficially resemble dandelions, appear in early spring before dandelions appear. The leaves, which resemble a colt's foot in cross section, do not appear usually until after the seeds are set. Thus, the flowers appear on stems with no apparent leaves, and the later appearing leaves then wither and die during the season without seeming to set flowers. The plant is typically 10–30 cm in height.

Comfrey
  • Botanical: Symphytum officinale
  • Family: Boraginaceae
  • Known as: Arznei-Beinwell, Beinwurz, Bienenkraut, Echter Beinwell, Gemeiner Beinwell, Gemeine Wallwurz, Gewöhnlicher Beinwell, Glotwurzel, Grosse Wallwurz, Hasenbrot, Hasenlaub, Himmelsbrot, Honigblum, Komfrei, Kuchenkraut, Milchwurz, Schadheilwurzel, Schmalwurz
  • Old Use: medicinal

Comfrey

The leafy stem, 2 to 3 feet high, is stout, angular and hollow, broadly winged at the top and covered with bristly hairs. The lower, radical leaves are very large, up to 10 inches long, ovate in shape and covered with rough hairs which promote itching when touched. The stem-leaves are decurrent, i.e. a portion of them runs down the stem, the body of the leaf being continued beyond its base and point of attachment with the stem. They decrease in size the higher they grow up the stem, which is much branched above and terminated by one-sided clusters of drooping flowers, either creamy yellow, or purple, growing on short stalks.

Coriander
  • Botanical: Coriandrum sativum
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Coriander, Koriander, Arabische Petersilie, Asiatische Petersilie, Chinesische Petersilie, Gartenkoriander, Gebauter Koriander, Gewürzkoriander, Indische Petersilie, Kaliander, Klanner, Schwindelkorn, Schwindelkraut, Stinkdill, Wandläusekraut, Wanzendill
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fruity, herbaceius, spicy, sweet, warm

Coriander

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Coriander is native to regions spanning from southern Europe and North Africa to southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to 50 cm (20 in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems.

Corn
  • Botanical: Zea mays
  • Family: Poaceae
  • Known as: Maize, Mais,
  • Old Use: culinary
  • Aroma: earthy, oriental

Corn

A monoecious plant. Male flowers in terminal racemes; spikelets, two-flowered glumes nearly equal, herbaceous, terminating in two sharp points; females, axillary in the sheaths of the leaves.

The spikes or ears proceed from the stalls at various distances from the ground, and are closely enveloped in several thin leaves, forming a sheath called the husk; the ears consist of a cylindrical substance, a pith called the cob; on this the seeds are ranged in eight rows, each row having thirty or more seeds.