• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Plant

Cumin
  • Botanical: Cuminum cyminum
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Cumin Acre, Sweet Cumin, Anise Acre.
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy

Cumin

Its stem is slender and branched, rarely exceeding 1 foot in height and somewhat angular. The leaves are divided into long, narrow segments like Fennel, but much smaller and are of a deep green colour, generally turned back at the ends. The upper leaves are nearly stalkless, but the lower ones have longer leaf-stalks.

Dandelion
  • Botanical: Taraxacum officinale
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Löwenzahn, Gemeiner Löwenzahn,
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Dandelion

Taraxacum officinale grows from generally unbranched taproots and produces one to more than ten stems that are typically 5 to 40 cm tall, but sometimes up to 70 cm tall. The stems can be tinted purplish, they are upright or lax, and produce flower heads that are held as tall or taller than the foliage. The foliage may be upright-growing or horizontally spreading; the leaves have petioles that are either unwinged or narrowly winged.

Elder
  • Botanical: Sambucus nigra
  • Family: Adoxaceae
  • Known as: Holler, Hollunder, Schwarzer Holunder, Flieder,
  • Aroma: clean, citrus, floral, fresh, fruity

Elder

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 6 m (20 ft) tall and wide (rarely 10m tall). The bark, light grey when young, changes to a coarse grey outer bark with lengthwise furrowing. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, 10–30 cm long, pinnate with five to seven (rarely nine) leaflets, the leaflets 5–12 cm long and 3–5 cm broad, with a serrated margin.

Eucalyptus
  • Botanical: Eucalyptus globulus
  • Family: Myrtaceae
  • Known as: Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus globulus, Eukalyptus,
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius, medicinal, woody

Eucalyptus

The bark sheds often, peeling in large strips. The broad juvenile leaves are borne in opposite pairs on square stems. They are about 6 to 15 cm long and covered with a blue-grey, waxy bloom, which is the origin of the common name "blue gum".

The mature leaves are narrow, sickle-shaped and dark shining green. They are arranged alternately on rounded stems and range from 15 to 35 cm in length.

Fennel
  • Botanical: Foeniculum vulgare
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, Brotsamen, Enis, Femis, Fenikl, Fenis, Fenkel, Finchel, Frauenfenchel
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary
  • Aroma: spicy, sweet

Fennel

Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, is a perennial herb. It is erect, glaucous green, and grows to heights of up to 2.5 m, with hollow stems. The leaves grow up to 40 cm long; they are finely dissected, with the ultimate segments filiform (threadlike), about 0.5 mm wide. (Its leaves are similar to those of dill, but thinner.) The flowers are produced in terminal compound umbels 5–15 cm wide, each umbel section having 20–50 tiny yellow flowers on short pedicels.

Fern
  • Botanical: Dryopteris filix
  • Family: Dryopteridaceae
  • Known as: Dryopteris filix-mas

Fern

The semi-evergreen leaves have an upright habit and reach a maximum length of 150 cm (59 in), with a single crown on each rootstock. The bipinnate leaves consist of 20-35 pinnae on each side of the rachis. The leaves taper at both ends, with the basal pinnae about half the length of the middle pinnae.

Fir
  • Botanical: Abies alba, Abies pectinata
  • Family: Pinaceae
  • Known as: Abies alba Miller., Abies alba, Silver fir, european silver fir, Weißtanne
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal; manufacturing
  • Aroma: fresh, earthy, sweet, woody

Fir

A. alba is a large evergreen coniferous tree growing to 40–50 metres (130–160 ft) (exceptionally 60 metres (200 ft)) tall and with a trunk diameter of up to 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in).

The largest measured tree was 68 m tall and had a trunk diameter of 3.8 metres (12 ft). It occurs at altitudes of 300–1,700 metres (980–5,580 ft) (mainly over 500 metres (1,600 ft)), on mountains with a rainfall of over 1,000 millimetres (39 in).

Flax
  • Botanical: Linum usitatissimum
  • Family: Linaceae
  • Known as: Flax, Flax Seed, Faserlein, Flachs, Flachsbeere, Flas, Flax, Gemeiner Lein, Glix, Haarlinsen, Lein, Leinbleaml, Leinsamen, Öl-Lein, Saat-Lein
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius

Flax

Flax, Linum usitatissimum, is an upright annual plant growing to 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) tall, with slender stems. The leaves are glaucous green, slender lanceolate, 20–40 mm long and 3 mm broad.

The flowers are pure pale blue, 15–25 mm diameter, with five petals; they can also be bright red. The fruit is a round, dry capsule 5–9 mm diameter, containing several glossy brown seeds shaped like an apple pip, 4–7 mm long.

Frankincense
  • Botanical: Boswellia Serrata
  • Family: Burseraceae
  • Known as: Olibanum, Weihrauch, Salai, Boswellia carteri, frankincense
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary
  • Aroma: earthy, smoky, woody

Frankincense

Obtained from the leafy forest tree Boswellia Thurifera, with leaves deciduous, alternate towards the tops of branches, unequally pinnated; leaflets in about ten pairs with an odd one opposite, oblong, obtuse, serrated, pubescent, sometimes alternate; petioles short.

Flowers, white or pale rose on short pedicels in single axillary racemes shorter than the leaves. Calyx, small five-toothed, persistent; corolla with five obovate-oblong, very patent petals, acute at the base, inserted under the margin of the disk, acstivation slightly imbricative. Stamens, ten, inserted under the disk, alternately shorter; filaments subulate, persistent.

Gentian Yellow
  • Botanical: Gentiana lutea
  • Family: Gentianaceae
  • Known as: Gentian Yellow, Great Yellow Gentian, Gentiana lutea, Anzianwurzel, Bergfieberwurzel, Bitterwurzel, Butterwurz, Darmwurzen, Gelbsuchtwurzen, Halunkenwurz, Istrianswurzel, Jänzene, Jäuse, Sauwurz, Zergang, Zinzalwurz, Gentianae radix,
  • Old Use: culinary

Gentian Yellow

The root is long and thick, generally about a foot long and an inch in diameter, but sometimes even a yard or more long and 2 inches in diameter, of a yellowish-brown colour and a very bitter taste.

The stem grows 3 or 4 feet high or more, with a pair of leaves opposite to one another, at each joint. The lowest leaves have short foot-stalks, but the upper ones are stalkless, their bases almost embracing the stem.

Ginger
  • Botanical: Zingiber officinale
  • Family: Zingiberaceae
  • Known as: Curcuma petiolata, Hidden Lily, Jewel of Thailand, Siam Tulip, Hidden Ginger, Queen lily, Ingber, Imber, Immerwurzel, Ingwerwurzel
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: citrus, fresh, fruity, spicy, warm, woody

Ginger

Ginger is a spice and more popular in Central Europe, probably because the exotic cuisine, spreading more and more. Many grocery stores now have to get fresh ginger roots.

But not only as an exotic spice, ginger is suitable, but also a valuable remedy. His special ability is to eliminate nausea.

Grape
  • Botanical: Vitis vinifera
  • Family: Vitaceae
  • Known as: Wine Grape, Vitis vinifera, Weinstock, Traubenstock, Weintraube
  • Old Use: culinary, medicinal use
  • Aroma: sweet, warm

Grape

Vitis vinifera is a deciduous Climber growing to 15 m (49ft 3in) at a fast rate. It has larger fruits, 6-22 mm, which are sweet and vary in colour from green, yellow, red, or blackish-purple, with 2 or no seeds. 

Vine stems are "lianas" or woody, climbing vines and can be up to 35 m, climbing over trees, rocks or the pergola at the third floor of my neighbour's apartment. In cultivation it is usually reduced by annual pruning to 1-3 m. Most grapes have loose, flaky bark on older wood usually peeling from old stems in long shreds, but smooth bark on 1-year-old wood.

Gum Arabic
  • Botanical: Acacia senegal
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: acacia gum, chaar gund, char goond, meska
  • Old Use: culinary use; production of ink

Gum Arabic

Acacia senegal is a low branching shrub or small tree to 7 m high (maximum 15 m). The tree flowers during the rainy season and loses its leaves during the dry season. When water is only available at great depth, deeply penetrating tap roots can develop, and the tree will grow considerably larger than normal.

Hollyhock
  • Botanical: Althaea rosea
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Common Hollyhock, Bauerneibisch, Baummalve, Gartenmalve, Herbstrose, Pappelrose, Roseneibisch, Schwarze Malve, Stockmalve, Winterrose
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Hollyhock

It is a tall, upright perennial has single flowers of various colors that grow along a spike. It blooms in early summer and midsummer.

A. rosea is a robust biennial or short-lived perennial to 2m or more, with shallowly lobed, rounded leaves and long erect racemes of open funnel-shaped flowers to 10cm across, which may be pink, purple, red, white or yellow

Hops
  • Botanical: Humulus lupulus
  • Family: Cannabaceae
  • Known as: Hops, Humulus lupulus, Hoppen, Hopf, Hecken-Hopfen, Weiden-Hopfen
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Hops

The root is stout and perennial. The stem that arises from it every year is of a twining nature, reaching a great length, flexible and very tough, angled and prickly, with a tenacious fibre.
The leaves are heart-shaped and lobed, on foot-stalks, and as a rule placed opposite one another on the stem, though sometimes the upper leaves are arranged singly on the stem, springing from altenate sides. They are of a dark-green colour with their edges finely toothed.