• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Plant

Juniper
  • Botanical: Juniperus communis
  • Family: Cupressaceae
  • Known as: Juniperus communis L., Wacholder, Gemeiner Wacholder, Genevrier commun, Juniper
  • Old Use: Digestive problems, disease of the kidney and bladder
  • Aroma: fresh, fruity, forest, sweet, woody

Juniper

Juniperus communis L. is a coniferous evergreen shrub or a small columnar tree, multistemmed, decumbent or rarely upright. The crown is generally depressed. It grows very slowly. The morphological characteristics including growth form differ somewhat according to variety. Adventitious root development can occur when branches come in contact with the ground become buried. Juniper has a thin, brown, fibrous bark which exfoliates in thin strips.

Kola
  • Botanical: Cola acuminata
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Cola nitida, Kolanuss
  • Old Use: medicinal and culonary use

Kola

This tree grows about 40 feet high, has yellow flowers, spotted with purple; leaves 6 to 8 inches long, pointed at both ends.

The trees have yellow flowers with purple spots, and star-shaped fruit. Inside the fruit, about a dozen round or square seeds can be found in a white seed shell.

The seeds are extensively used as a condiment by the natives of Western and Central tropical Africa, also by the negroes of the West Indies and Brazil, who introduced the trees to these countries. 

Larch
  • Botanical: Larix europaea
  • Family: Pinaceae
  • Known as: Lärchtann, Lerbam, Lörbaum, Lorchbaum, Lertanne, Lörtanne, Schönholz
  • Old Use: manufacturing; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, woody

Larch

The larch is a deciduous tree and loses its leaves in the autumn. The shoots are dimorphic, with growth divided into long shoots typically 10–50 centimetres long[citation needed] and bearing several buds, and short shoots only 1–2 mm long with only a single bud.

The leaves are needle-like, 2–5 centimetres long, slender (under 1 cm wide). They are borne singly, spirally arranged on the long shoots, and in dense clusters of 20–50 needles on the short shoots. The needles turn yellow and fall in the late autumn, leaving the trees leafless through the winter.

Laurel
  • Botanical: Laurus nobilis
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: Bay Laurel, Sweet Bay, True Laurel, Grecian Laurel, Lorbeer
  • Old Use: culinary; ritual; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, forest, spicy

Laurel

The laurel can vary greatly in size and height, sometimes reaching 10–18 metres (33–59 ft) tall. Laurus is a genus of evergreen trees belonging to the Laurel family, Lauraceae. 

The smooth bark may be olive-green or of a reddish hue. The luxurious, evergreen leaves are alternate, with short stalks, lanceolate, 3 to 4 inches long, the margin smooth and wavy. They are thick, smooth, and of a shining, dark green colour. The flowers are small, yellow and unisexual, and grow in small clusters.

Laurel Cherry
  • Botanical: Prunus laurocerasus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Known as: Laurel Cherry, Prunus laurocerasus, English laurel, Lorbeerkirsche,

Laurel Cherry

Prunus laurocerasus is an evergreen shrub or small to medium-sized tree, growing to 5 to 15 metres (16 to 49 ft) tall, rarely to 18 metres (59 ft), with a trunk up to 60cm broad. The leaves are dark green, leathery, shiny, (5–)10–25(–30)cm long and 4–10cm broad, with a finely serrated margin. The leaves can have the scent of almonds when crushed.

Lavender
  • Botanical: Lavendula officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Lavendel, Lavandula angustifolia,
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary

Lavender

The genus includes annual or short-lived herbaceous perennial plants, and suffrutescent perennials, subshrubs or small shrubs.

Leaf shape is diverse across the genus. They are simple in some commonly cultivated species; in others they are pinnately toothed, or pinnate, sometimes multiple pinnate and dissected. In most species the leaves are covered in fine hairs or indumentum, which normally contain the essential oils.

Lemon
  • Botanical: Citrus limon
  • Family: Rutaceae
  • Known as: Lemon, Citrus limon, Citrus Limonum Risso, Zitrone
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: clean, citrus, fruity

Lemon

Citrus limon is the leading acid citrus fruit, because of its very appealing color, odor and flavor. The true lemon tree reaches 10 to 20 feet in height and usually has sharp thorns on the twigs. Leaves are reddish when young, and become dark green above, light green below. Mildly fragrant flowers may be solitary, or there may be two or more. Buds are reddish. Opened flowers have 4 or 5 petals, white on upper surface, purplish beneath. Fruit is oval with a nipple-like protuberance and is light-yellow. It is aromatic, and dotted with oil glands.

Lettuce Bitter
  • Botanical: Lactuca virosa
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Bitter Lettuce, Lactuca virosa, Wild Lettuce, Bitter lettuce, Laitue vireuse, Opium Lettuce, Poisonous Lettuce, Rakutu-Karyumu-So, Gift-Lattich, Wilder Lattich, Stinklattich, Stinksalat

Lettuce Bitter

It is a biennial herb growing to a maximum height of 6 feet. The erect stem, springing from a brown tap-root, is smooth and pale green, sometimes spotted with purple. There are a few prickles on the lower part and short horizontal branches above. The numerous, large, radical leaves are from 6 to 18 inches long, entire, and obovate-oblong. The stem leaves are scanty, alternate, and small, clasping the stem with two small lobes.

Lily of the Valley
  • Botanical: Convallaria majalis
  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Known as: Augenkraut, Chaldron, Faldron, Galleieli, Glasblümli, Herrenblümli, Maiblume, Maiblümchen, Maienlilie, Maizauken, Marienglöckchen, Marienriesli, Niesekraut, Schillerlilie, Schneetropfen, Springauf, Tallilie, Zaucken

Lily of the Valley

C. majalis is a herbaceous perennial plant that forms extensive colonies by spreading underground stems called rhizomes. New upright shoots are formed at the ends of stolons in summer, these upright dormant stems are often called pips. These grow in the spring into new leafy shoots that still remain connected to the other shoots under ground, often forming extensive colonies. The stems grow to 15–30 cm tall, with one or two leaves 10–25 cm long, flowering stems have two leaves and a raceme of 5–15 flowers on the stem apex.

Linden
  • Botanical: Tilia
  • Family: Malvaceae, Tiliaceae
  • Known as: Lime Tree, Bee Tree, tilia grandifolia, tilia cordata, Linden, Sommerlinde, Grossblättrige Linde, Winterlinde, Stein-Linde, Kleinblättrige Linde
  • Old Use: medicinal
  • Aroma: citrus, forest, warm

Linden

It is a large tree attaining a height of from 60 to 125 feet with a trunk diameter of 2 to 5 feet, with spreading branches. The somewhat leathery leaves are pointed at the apex, heart-shaped at the base, with sharply toothed margins and are borne on stems about 1 or 2 inches long. The flowers are produced in great abundance from May to June in drooping clusters composed of from 6 to 20 yellowish, very fragrant flowers.

Malva
  • Botanical: Malva sylvestris
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Mallow, High Mallow, Malva, Malve, Käsepappel, Gänsepappel, Kasköpfe, Käslein, Katzenkrallen, Krallenblumen, Pappeln, Schafkas, Schwellkraut
  • Old Use: medicinal
  • Aroma: earthy, herbaceius

Malva

Malva sylvestris is a spreading herb, which is an annual in North Africa, biennial in the Mediterranean and a perennial elsewhere. Three feet (one meter) tall, (3 meters has been observed in a wild or escaped from cultivation setting, and several cultivated plants of 2 meter or more in height) with a growth habit which can be straight or decumbent, branched and covered with fine soft hairs or none at all, M. sylvestris is pleasing in appearance when it first starts to flower, but as the summer advances, "the leaves lose their deep green color and the stems assume a ragged appearance".

Melissa
  • Botanical: Melissa officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Zitronenmelisse, Melissa, Lemon balm, melissa_officinalis
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal

Melissa

Melissa Officinalis is a perennial herb from the Lamiaceae (mint) family, which just happens to be the same family as Salvia Divinorum. This herb can grow to be 3 feet (1 meter) tall, and 3 feet (1 meter) wide. The leaves are fuzzy with many tiny hairs, they vary in shape from oblong oval to a heart shape and all have a jagged toothed edge.

Monkshood
  • Botanical: Aconitum napellus
  • Family: Ranunculaceae
  • Known as: aconite, wolfsbane, fuzi, monk's blood
  • Old Use: In Chinese medicine processed aconite was used to treat heart failure and other heart diseases.

Monkshood

It is an herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1 m tall, with hairless stems and leaves. The leaves are rounded, 5–10 cm diameter, palmately divided into five to seven deeply lobed segments. The flowers are dark purple to bluish-purple, narrow oblong helmet-shaped, 1–2 cm tall.

Mullein Orange
  • Botanical: Verbascum phlomoides
  • Family: Scrophulariaceae
  • Known as: Verbascum thapsiforme, Königskerze

Mullein Orange

They are biennial or perennial plants, rarely annuals or subshrubs, growing to 0.5–3 m tall. The plants first form a dense rosette of leaves at ground level, subsequently sending up a tall flowering stem. Biennial plants form the rosette the first year and the stem the following season. The leaves are spirally arranged, often densely hairy, though glabrous (hairless) in some species. The flowers have five symmetrical petals; petal colours in different species include yellow (most common), orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous minute seeds.

Mustard Black
  • Botanical: Brassica nigra
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Black Mustard, Brassica nigra, Sinapis nigra, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard Black

Brassica nigra is a ANNUAL growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in). It grows from two to eight feet tall, with racemes of small yellow flowers. These flowers are usually up to 1/3" across, with four petals each. The leaves are covered in small hairs; they can wilt on hot days, but recover at night.
 It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.The plant is self-fertile.