• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Plant Families

Alanapfel
  • Known as: Später Prinzessinapfel, Alant Apple,

Alantapfel

Almond
  • Botanical: Prunus dulcis
  • Family: Rosaceae, Amygdalus communis,
  • Known as: Sweet Almond, Bitter Almond, Mandel, Bitter Mandel
  • Old Use: culinary

Almond

The almond is a deciduous tree, growing 4–10 m (13–33 ft) in height, with a trunk of up to 30 cm (12 in) in diameter. The young twigs are green at first, becoming purplish where exposed to sunlight, then grey in their second year. The leaves are 3–5 inches long, with a serrated margin and a 2.5 cm (1 in) petiole. The flowers are white to pale pink, 3–5 cm (1–2 in) diameter with five petals, produced singly or in pairs and appearing before the leaves in early spring.

Aloe
  • Botanical: Aloe succotrina
  • Family: Asphodelaceae
  • Known as: Aloe, Aloe succotrina, Aloe bardadensis, Aloe capensis, Aloe Fynbos, Wüstenlilie, Aloe vera, Aloe vera, Synonyme: Aloe barbadensis, Aloe perfoliata, Aloe vulgaris, Aloe indica, Aloe chinensis,
  • Old Use: medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic

Aloe

The Aloe succotrina plant forms clusters of between 1–2 metres (3.3–6.6 ft) diameter, with its leaves forming dense rosettes. In winter when it flowers it produces a tall raceme, bearing shiny red flowers that are pollinated by sunbirds.

Arnica
  • Botanical: Arnica Montana
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Arnika, Mountain Arnica, Bergdotterblume, Engelkraut, Fallkraut, Johannisblume, Kraftrose, Kraftwurz, St-Luzianskraut, Stichwurzel, Wohlverleih, Wundkraut, Wolferley, Wolffelei, Wolfsblume, Wolfsbann, Wolfsdistel, Bergwurz, Gemswurz, Kraftwurzel, Bergweg

Arnica

Arnica plants have a deep-rooted, erect stem that is usually unbranched. Their downy opposite leaves are borne towards the apex of the stem. The ovoid, leathery basal leaves are arranged in a rosette.

They show large yellow or orange flowers, 6–8 cm wide with 10–15 long ray florets and numerous disc florets. The phyllaries (a bract under the flowerhead) has long spreading hairs.

Belladonna Atropa
  • Botanical: Atropa belladonna
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Known as: Atropa belladonna, Belladonna, Devil's Berries, Death Cherries, Deadly Nightshade, Tollkirsche
  • Old Use: medicinal

Belladonna Atropa

The root is thick, fleshy and whitish, about 6 inches long, or more, and branching. It is perennial. The purplishcoloured stem is annual and herbaceous. It is stout, 2 to 4 feet high, undivided at the base, but dividing a little above the ground into three - more rarely two or four branches, each of which again branches freely.

Birch Sweet
  • Botanical: Betula lenta
  • Family: Betulaceae
  • Known as: Betula alba, Black Birch, Cherry Birch, Mahogany Birch, Spice Birch, Maibaum, Frühlingsbaum, Besenbaum, Besenbirke, Bork, Bark, Hexenbesen, Hängebirke, Moorbirke, Rauhbirke, Sandbirke, Warzenbirke, Weissbirke
  • Old Use: culinary and medicinal use
  • Aroma: sweet

Birch Sweet

It is a  A medium sized tree with a single straight trunk reaching up to 60 feet tall.

Leaf: Alternate, simple, pinnately-veined, ovate, with an acute tip and cordate base, singly or irregularly doubly, sharply serrate margins, 2 to 4 inches long, petiole is stout and pubescent, dark shiny green above, paler below.

Boldo
  • Botanical: Peumus boldus
  • Family: Monimiaceae
  • Known as: Boldea fragrans, Peumus fragrans, boldo, boldu, boldus, boldoa, boldina, baldina, molina
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary
  • Aroma: sweet

Boldo

Boldo is an evergreen tree or shrub growing up to six metres in height. It belongs to the monimiaceae family, which are closely related to the laurel family. It is dioecious.

Boldo's light grey-green leathery leaves are elliptical-oval, entire, and have light-coloured tubercles on the surface. They have a characteristic odour and a burning-spicy, slightly bitter taste. The intensely fragrant radial flowers are white or yellowish and arranged in an inflorescence. The oval, aromatic pitted fruits are edible.

Boldo flowers throughout the year.

Buckbean
  • Botanical: Menyanthes trifoliata
  • Family: Menyanthaceae
  • Known as: Common bog bean, Bachgräslein, Bachgräsli, Biberklee, Bitterblad, Bitterblatt, Bitterklee, Bocksbohnenblätter, Bohnenblad, Butterklee, Dreeblatt, Dreiblatt, Dreiblättriger Fieberklee, Feverkrut, Fieberklee, Fröschekohl, Gallkraut, Kreuzklee
  • Old Use: once-dreaded scurvy

Buckbean

It is a green, glabrous plant, with creeping rootstock and procumbent stem, varying in length according to situation, covered by the sheaths of the leaves, which are on long, fleshy, striated petioles and three-partite, the leaflets being entire and about 2 inches long and 1 broad. It blossoms from May to July, the flowers being borne on long stalks, 6 to 18 inches high, longer than the leaves and clustered together in a thick short spike, rendering them very conspicuous. The corollas, 3/4 inch across, are outwardly rose-coloured and inwardly white and hairy, with reddish stamens. The Buckbean is one of the prettiest of our wild flowers deserving of cultivation in the garden, where it grows and thrives well, if planted in peat with water constantly round the roots.

Cacao
  • Botanical: Theobroma cacao
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Cacao, Cocoa, Theobroma cacao, Kakao
  • Old Use: ceremonial, medicinal, culinary

Cacao

Leaves are alternate, entire, unlobed, 10–40 cm (3.9–15.7 in) long and 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) broad.

The flowers are produced in clusters directly on the trunk and older branches; this is known as cauliflory. The flowers are small, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with pink calyx. While many of the world's flowers are pollinated by bees (Hymenoptera) or butterflies/moths (Lepidoptera), cacao flowers are pollinated by tiny flies, Forcipomyia midges in the order Diptera.

Cajeput
  • Botanical: Melaleuca leucadendra
  • Family: Myrtaceae
  • Known as: Cajuput Tree, Cajeput, Silberbaum Myrtenheide, Kajeputbaum, Melaleukaöl, Cajeputbaum
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Cajeput

The tree has a long flexible trunk with irregular ascending branches, covered with a pale thick, lamellated bark it is soft and spongy and from time to time throws off its outer layer in flakes; leaves entire, linear, lanceolate, ash colour, alternate on short foot-stalks; flowers sessile, white, on a long spike.

Caraway
  • Botanical: Carum carvi
  • Family: Apiaceae
  • Known as: Caraway, Carum carvi, meridian fennel, Persian cumin, Kümmel, Kuemmel,
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: sharp, spicy

Caraway

It is a biennial, with smooth, furrowed stems growing 1 1/2 to 2 feet high, hearing finely cut leaves, and umbels of white flowers which blossom in June. The fruitswhich are popularly and incorrectly called seeds - and which correspond in general character to those of the other plants of this large family, are laterally compressed, somewhat horny and translucent, slightly curved, and marked with five distinct, pale ridges.

Cashew
  • Botanical: Anacardium occidentale
  • Family: Anacardiaceae
  • Known as: Cajueiro, cashew, cashu, casho, acajuiba, caju, acajou, acaju, acajaiba, alcayoiba, anacarde, anacardier, anacardo, cacajuil, cajou, gajus, jocote maranon, maranon, merey, noix d’acajou, pomme cajou, pomme, jambu, jambu golok, jambu mete, jambu monyet
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary
  • Aroma: sweet

Cashew

The tree is large and evergreen, growing to 10-12m (~32 ft) tall, with a short, often irregularly shaped trunk. The leaves are spirally arranged, leathery textured, elliptic to obovate, 4 to 22 cm long and 2 to 15 cm broad, with smooth margins. The flowers are produced in a panicle or corymb up to 26 cm long, each flower is small, pale green at first, then turning reddish, with five slender, acute petals 7 to 15 mm long.

Cayenne Pepper
  • Botanical: Capsicum annuum
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Known as: Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum chinense, Paprika, Peperoni, Pepperoni, Pfefferoni, Pfefferschoten, Chilli, Chillie, Chilie, Chile, Cayennepfeffer
  • Old Use: culinary, medicinal use

Cayenne Pepper

It is a shrubby perennial plant 2 to 6 feet high. Branches angular, usually enlarged and slightly purple at the nodes; petioles medium; peduncles slender, often in pairs, and longer than the fruit; calyx cup-shaped, clasping base of fruit which is red, ovate, and long; seeds small and flat, from ten to twenty-nine. The cuticle of the pericarp is uniformly striated and in this particular is distinct from other species.

 

Chamomile Corn
  • Botanical: Anthemis arvensis
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Mayweed, Scentless Chamomile, Chamomile, Kamille, Matricaria chamomilla, German chamomile

Chamomile Corn

The whole plant is covered in short hairs. The leaves are finely divided with narrow, parallel-sided segments, pointed at the tips and have a pleasant, chamomile-like scent. The 'flowers', borne singly on stout stalks, are technically compound flower-heads made up of numerous small florets and resemble a Daisy. The central florets are yellow, while around the edge are the ray-florets, which have a single long white petal pointing outwards.

Chamomile German
  • Botanical: Matricaria recutita
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Chamomile, Kamille, Matricaria chamomilla, German chamomile

Chamomile German

M. chamomilla has a branched, erect and smooth stem, which grows to a height of 15–60 cm (6-24inches). The long and narrow leaves are bipinnate or tripinnate.

The flowers are borne in paniculate flower heads (capitula). The white ray florets are furnished with a ligule, while the disc florets are yellow. The hollow receptacle is swollen and lacks scales. This property distinguishes German chamomile from corn chamomile (Anthemis arvensis), which has a receptacle with scales.