• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Plant Uses

Spruce
  • Botanical: Picea abies
  • Family: Pinaceae
  • Known as: Norway Spruce, Spruce, Picea abies, Feichten, Gräne, Krestling, Pechtanne, Rothtanne, Rottanne, Schwarztanne
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, smoky, sweet, woody

Spruce

It is a large, fast-growing evergreen coniferous tree growing 35–55 m (115–180 ft) tall and with a trunk diameter of 1 to 1.5 m. It can grow fast when young, up to 1 m (3 ft) per year for the first 25 years under good conditions, but becomes slower once over 20 m (66 ft) tall. The shoots are orange-brown and glabrous (hairless). The leaves are needle-like, 12–24 mm long, quadrangular in cross-section (not flattened), and dark green on all four sides with inconspicuous stomatal lines.

Thyme
  • Botanical: Thymus vulgaris
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Thyme, Thymus vulgaris, Thymiane, Quendel, Feld-Thymian, Sand-Thymian, Betony, Feldbulla, Feldkümmel, Feldpoley, Geismajoran, Geschwulstkraut, Grundling, Hollaien, Hühnerbolle, Immenkraut, Keale, Kinderkraut, Kounala, Kranzlkraut, Kudelkraut, Kückenkümmel
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius, spicy, warm

Thyme

Thymus is a perennial low aromatic shrub with much-branched woody stems forming dense tufts from which arise tiny, paired opposite leaves on short stalks, each with two minute leaflets at the base. The leaves are 6-8mm long, the underside covered with fine hairs. The flowers are arranged in whorls in the axils of the upper leaves, and are of a typical labiate appearance, pink to lilac in colour.

Tobacco Aztec
  • Botanical: Nicotiana rustica
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Known as: tabak, lobelia, bladderpod, emetic herb, emetic weed, gagroot, vomitroot, vomitwort, pukeweed, wild tobacco, asthma weed, bladderpod, eyebright
  • Old Use: medicinal and spiritual
  • Aroma: sharp

Tobacco Aztec

Nicotiana rustica is a annual growing to 1.5 m (5ft). It is hardy to zone 8 and is frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs).

Flower petal is green to brown yellow; leaves are simple (lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets) arranged alternatively: there is one leaf per node along the stem. Its leaves are wider and rounder than some of our other tobacco species, and the tubular, yellowish flowers are shorter.

Tobacco Cultivated
  • Botanical: Nicotiana tabacum
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Known as: bright tobacco
  • Old Use: smoking

Tobacco Cultivated

Nicotiana tabacum is a annual growing to 1.2m. It is hardy to zone 8 and is frost tender. It is in flower from Jul to September, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, lepidoptera.

The ovate to lanceolate leaves are alternate, spiraling around the stem, and often large—in many varieties, 0.6 to 1.0 m (2 to 3 ft) long and half as wide.

Tolu Balsam
  • Botanical: Myroxylon balsamum
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Tolu Balsam, Myroxylon balsamum, Balsam of Tolu, Balsam of Peru, Myroxylon, Perubalsam, Balsambäume, Cabreúva, Cabreuva, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Quina, Balsamo
  • Old Use: medicinal, culinary
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy, sweet, warm

Tolu Balsam

The trees are large, growing to 40 metres (130 ft) tall, with evergreen pinnate leaves 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, with 5–13 leaflets. The flowers are white with yellow stamens, produced in racemes. The fruit is a pod 7–11 centimetres (2.8–4.3 in) long, containing a single seed.

The wood is dark brown, with a deep red heartwood. Natural oils grant it excellent decay resistance. In fact, it is also resistant to preservative treatment. Its specific gravity is 0.74 to 0.81.

Turmeric
  • Botanical: Curcuma longa
  • Family: Zingiberaceae
  • Known as: Turmeric, Curcuma longa, Indian saffron, Kurkuma, Gelber Ingwer, Gelbwurz, Gilbwurz
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, spicy, woody

Turmeric

A perennial plant with roots or tubers oblong, palmate, and deep orange inside; root-leaves about 2 feet long, lanceolate, long, petioled, tapering at each end, smooth, of a uniform green; petioles sheathing spike, erect, central, oblong, green; flowers dull yellow, three or five together surrounded by bracteolae. It is propagated by cuttings from the root, which when dry is in curved cylindrical or oblong tubers 2 or 3 inches in length, and an inch in diameter, pointed or tapering at one end, yellowish externally, with transverse, parallel rings internally deep orange or reddish brown, marked with shining points, dense, solid, short, granular fracture, forming a lemon yellow powder. It has a peculiar fragrant odour and a bitterish, slightly acrid taste, like ginger, exciting warmth in the mouth and colouring the saliva yellow.

Vanilla
  • Botanical: Vanilla planifolia
  • Family: Orchidaceae
  • Known as: Vanilla, Vanilla planifolia, Flat-leaved Vanilla, Tahitian Vanilla, Gewürzvanille, Vanillin, Vanille, Echte Vanille
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: spicy, sweet

Vanilla

It uses its fleshy roots to support itself as it grows. Flowers: greenish-yellow, with a diameter of 5 cm (2 in). They last only a day, and must be pollinated manually, during the morning, if fruit is desired. The plants are self-fertile, and pollination simply requires a transfer of the pollen from the anther to the stigma. If pollination does not occur, the flower is dropped the next day. In the wild, there is less than 1% chance that the flowers will be pollinated, so in order to receive a steady flow of fruit, the flowers must be hand-pollinated when grown on farms.

Vermouth
  • Botanical: Artemisia absinthium
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Vermouth, Absinthium, Absinthe, Wormwood, Common wormwood, Green Ginger, Absinth, Aetsch, Bermet, Bitterals, Else, Eisenkraut, Gottvergesse, Hilligbitter, Magenkraut, Mottenstock, Würmut, Wiegenkraut
  • Aroma: camphorus, earthy, medicinal, warm, woody

Vermouth

Artemisia absinthium is a herbaceous, perennial plant with fibrous roots. The stems are straight, growing to 0.8–1.2 metres (2 ft 7 in–3 ft 11 in) (rarely 1.5 m, but, sometimes even larger) tall, grooved, branched, and silvery-green. The leaves are spirally arranged, greenish-grey above and white below, covered with silky silvery-white trichomes, and bearing minute oil-producing glands; the basal leaves are up to 25 cm long, bipinnate to tripinnate with long petioles, with the cauline leaves (those on the stem) smaller, 5–10 cm long, less divided, and with short petioles; the uppermost leaves can be both simple and sessile (without a petiole).

Walnut
  • Botanical: Juglans nigra
  • Family: Juglandaceae
  • Known as: Walnut, Juglans, Juglans regia, Wallnuss, Wälsche Nuss, Welschnuss-Baum, Nussbaum, Christnuss, Steinnuss
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: forest, earthy

Walnut

The tree grows to a height of 40 or 60 feet, with a large spreading top, and thick, massive stem. One accurately measured by Professor du Breuil, in Normandy, was upwards of 23 feet in circumference; and in some parts of France there are Walnut trees 300 years old, with stems of much greater thickness. In the southern parts of England the trees grow vigorously and bear abundantly, when not injured by late frosts in spring.

Wheat Common
  • Botanical: Triticum aestivum
  • Family: Poaceae
  • Known as: Common wheat, Wheat, Triticum aestivum, Bread Wheat, Weichweizen, Brotweizen, Weizen
  • Old Use: culinary
  • Aroma: earthy

Wheat Common

An annual, largely hairless grass, producing a spike (flowering and fruiting part) on each of its 1–5 culms (stems). Height is variable, from about 1.2–1.5 m for 1930s cultivars to about 85 cm for most modern cultivars, with a simultaneous strengthening of the culm so as to bear the increased weight (resulting from the increased grain yield) of the spike. This has been achieved by incorporating dwarfing genes, from Japanese cultivar Norin 10, into most modern (post 1960s) varieties.

Witch Hazel
  • Botanical: Hamamelis virginiana
  • Family: Hamamelidaceae
  • Known as: Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, Virginische Zaubernuss, Amerikanische Zaubernuss, Hamamelis, Hexenhasel, Hopfenhainbuche, Virginia-Zaubernuss, Wünschelrute, Zauberhasel, Zauberhaselnuss, Zaubernuss
  • Old Use: medicinal

Witch Hazel

This shrub, long known in cultivation, consists of several crooked branching trunks from one root, 4 to 6 inches in diameter, 10 to 12 feet in height, with a smooth grey bark, leaves 3 to 5 inches long and about 3 inches wide, on short petioles, alternate, oval or obovate, acuminate, obliquely subcordate at the base, the margin crenate, dentate, scabrous, with raised spots underneath, pinnately veined and having stellate hairs.

Wormwood
  • Botanical: Artemisia vulgaris
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Mugwort, Wormwood, Common Wormwood, Mugwurz, Buckell, Jungfernkraut, Gänsekraut, Wilder Wermut, Sonnwendgürtel
  • Old Use: culinary and medicinal use
  • Aroma: earthy, herbaceius, spicy, woody

Wormwood

Artemisia vulgaris (mugwort or common wormwood) is one of several species in the genus Artemisia commonly known as mugwort. It is a tall herbaceous perennial plant growing 1–2 m (rarely 2.5 m) tall, with a woody root. The leaves are 5–20 cm long, dark green, pinnate, with dense white tomentose hairs on the underside. The erect stem often has a red-purplish tinge. The rather small flowers (5 mm long) are radially symmetrical with many yellow or dark red petals. The narrow and numerous capitula (flower heads) spread out in racemose panicles.

Yarrow
  • Botanical: Achillea millefolium
  • Family: Asteroideae
  • Known as: Common Yarrow, Achillea millefolium, Schafgarbe, Bauchwehkraut, Blutkraut, Blutstillkraut, Frauenkraut, Frauendank, Gotteshand, Grillengras, Katzenkraut, Margaretenkraut, Katzenschwanz, Lämmerzunge, Schafrippen, Schafzunge, Tausendblatt
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius, spicy, sweet

Yarrow

The stem is angular and rough, the leaves alternate, 3 to 4 inches long and 1 inch broad, clasping the stem at the base, bipinnatifid, the segments very finely cut, giving the leaves a feathery appearance.

It flowers from June to September, the flowers, white or pale lilac, being like minute daisies, in flattened, terminal, loose heads, or cymes. The whole plant is more or less hairy, with white, silky appressed hairs.

Yerba Mate
  • Botanical: Ilex paraguariensis
  • Family: Aquifoliaceae
  • Known as: Yerba Mate, Ilex paraguariensis, Erva mate, Matestrauch, Mate-Teestrauch, Paraguay Tee
  • Old Use: culinary and medicinal use

Yerba Mate

Yerba mate, Ilex paraguariensis, begins as a shrub and then matures to a tree and can grow up to 15 metres (49 ft) tall. The leaves are evergreen, 7–11 cm long and 3–5.5 cm wide, with a serrated margin. The leaves are often called yerba (Spanish) or erva (Portuguese), both of which mean "herb". They contain caffeine (known in some parts of the world as mateine) and also contains related xanthine alkaloids and are harvested commercially.

The flowers are small, greenish-white, with four petals. The fruit is a red drupe 4–6 mm in diameter.

Zedoary
  • Botanical: Curcuma zedoaria
  • Family: Zingiberaceae
  • Known as: Zedoary, Curcuma zedoaria, Giftheil, Zitwer
  • Old Use: culinary, medicinal uses

Zedoary

Curcuma zedoaria, also known as Zedoary, is an herb that grows up to 1.2 m in height. This plant has both vertical aerial stems (pseudostems) and horizontal underground stems known as rhizomes, which allow the plant to spread so this species often grows in large clumps.
The swollen underground stems are yellow or orange colored inside and are aromatic when crushed. The leaves of Zedoary are oblong and can be up to 81 cm long and 18 cm wide. This species can be recognized by the presence of a purplish hue along the midvein of the leafblades.