• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Shrub

Mastic Tree
  • Botanical: Pistacia lentiscus
  • Family: Pistaciaceae
  • Known as: Mastixstrauch, Wilde Pistazie
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: resinous, smoky

Mastic Tree

A shrub rarely growing higher than 12 feet. The best Mastic occurs in roundish tears about the size of a small pea, or in flattened, irregular pear-shaped, or oblong pieces covered with a whitish powder. They are pale yellow in colour, which darkens with age. The odour is agreeable and the taste mild and resinous, and when chewed it becomes soft, so that it can easily be masticated. This characteristic enables it to be distinguished froma resin called Sanderach, which it resembles, but which when bitten breaks to powder.

Mullein Orange
  • Botanical: Verbascum phlomoides
  • Family: Scrophulariaceae
  • Known as: Verbascum thapsiforme, Königskerze

Mullein Orange

They are biennial or perennial plants, rarely annuals or subshrubs, growing to 0.5–3 m tall. The plants first form a dense rosette of leaves at ground level, subsequently sending up a tall flowering stem. Biennial plants form the rosette the first year and the stem the following season. The leaves are spirally arranged, often densely hairy, though glabrous (hairless) in some species. The flowers have five symmetrical petals; petal colours in different species include yellow (most common), orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous minute seeds.

Mustard Black
  • Botanical: Brassica nigra
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Black Mustard, Brassica nigra, Sinapis nigra, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard Black

Brassica nigra is a ANNUAL growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in). It grows from two to eight feet tall, with racemes of small yellow flowers. These flowers are usually up to 1/3" across, with four petals each. The leaves are covered in small hairs; they can wilt on hot days, but recover at night.
 It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.The plant is self-fertile.

Mustard India
  • Botanical: Brassica juncea
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Indian Mustard, Brassica juncea, Mustard Greens, Chinese mustard, Braune Senf, Indischer Senf, Sareptasenf, Ruten-Kohl, Chinesischer Senf
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard India

It is an erect annual, 3 feet or more in height, with smaller flowers than the White Mustard. The spear-shaped, upper leaves, linear, pointed, entire and smooth, and the shortly-beaked pods, readily distinguish it from the former species. The smooth, erect flattened pods, each provided with a short slender beak, contain about ten to twelve dark reddish-brown or black seeds, which are collected when ripe and dried.

Mustard White
  • Botanical: Sinapis alba
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: White Mustard, Sinapis alba, Yellow Mustard, Brassica alba, B. hirta, Weisser Senf, Gelbsenf, Weißsenf, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: cooking and medicinal use

Mustard White

It is an erect annual, 3 feet or more in height, with smaller flowers than the White Mustard. The spear-shaped, upper leaves, linear, pointed, entire and smooth, and the shortly-beaked pods, readily distinguish it from the former species. The smooth, erect flattened pods, each provided with a short slender beak, contain about ten to twelve dark reddish-brown or black seeds, which are collected when ripe and dried.

Myrrh
  • Botanical: Commiphora myrrha
  • Family: Burseraceae
  • Known as: Balsamodendron Myrrha. Commiphora Myrrha, var. Molmol. Mirra. Morr. Didin. Didthin. Bowl
  • Old Use: culinary; ritual; medicinal

Myrrh

A shrub or tree growing up to 5 m tall, scented myrrh has greenish or brownish peeling bark. The leaves are composed of 3 or 5-7 leaflets, 2.5 x 10 cm long when fully mature and oval to broadly oval in shape. The flowers are cream in colour and very small, being only a few mm wide at most. The fruit is rounded, about 1 cm in diameter and contains a single stone.

Purging Croton
  • Botanical: Croton tiglium
  • Family: Euphorbiaceae
  • Known as: Jamaal Gota, Crotonöl
  • Old Use: medical

Purging Croton

A small tree or shrub with a few spreading branches bearing alternate petiolate leaves which are ovate, acuminate, serrate, smooth, dark green on upper surface paler beneath and furnished with two glands at base.

Flowers in erect terminal racemes, scarcely as long as the leaf, the lower female, upper male, straw-coloured petals.

Fruit a smooth capsule of the size of a filbert, three cells, each containing a single seed; these seeds resemble castor beans in size and structure, oblong, rounded at the extremities with two faces; the kernel or endosperm is yellowish brown and abounds in oil.

The oil is obtained by expression from the seeds previously deprived of the shell.

Raspberry
  • Botanical: Rubus idaeus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Known as: Red Raspberry, Raspberry, and Wild Raspberry, Himbeere
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fruity, sweet, warm

Raspberry

The stems are erect and shrubby, biennial, with creeping perennial roots. Flowers: Royal purple or bluish pink, showy, fragrant, 1 to 2 in. broad, loosely clustered at top of stem. Calyx sticky-hairy, deeply 5-parted, with long, pointed tips; corolla of 5 rounded petals; stamens and pistils very numerous.

Ratanhia
  • Botanical: Krameria lappacea
  • Family: Polygalaceae
  • Known as: Para rhatany, Peruvian rhatany, Ratanhia, Rote Ratanhia, Payta Ratanhia
  • Old Use: medical

Ratanhia

It is a low shrub with large red flowers. The root, as found in commerce, consists of long, cylindrical pieces, varying in thickness from 1/4 to 1/2 inch or more (long Rhatany), or a short, thick portion, knotted, and as large as a man's fist (short, or stumpy Rhatany).

The bark of the root is thin, readily separable, rough and scaly; of a dark, reddish-brown colour outside, and bright brownish-red within. It breaks with a somewhat fibrous fracture, is tough and difficult to powder, and has a strong, purely astringent taste, tingeing the saliva red when chewed. The central woody portion is very hard and almost tasteless. Neither bark nor wood has any marked odour. As the virtues of Rhatany reside in the bark, the smaller pieces are preferable.

Rosemary
  • Botanical: Rosmarinus officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Rosmarin
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, sharp

Rosemary

Rosemary is an aromatic evergreen shrub that has leaves similar to hemlock needles. The leaves are used as a flavoring in foods such as stuffings and roast lamb, pork, chicken and turkey. It is native to the Mediterranean and Asia, but is reasonably hardy in cool climates. It can withstand droughts, surviving a severe lack of water for lengthy periods.

Roughbark
  • Botanical: Guaiacum officinale
  • Family: Zygophyllaceae
  • Known as: Guajacum officinale, Roughbark Lignum-vitae, Guaiacwood, Gaïacwood, Guajak

Roughbark

This small tree is very slow growing, reaching about 10 m in height with a trunk diameter of 60 cm. The tree is essentially evergreen throughout most of its native range. The leaves are compound, 2.5 to 3 cm in length, and 2 cm wide. The blue flowers have five petals that yield a bright-yellow-orange fruit with red flesh and black seeds.

Sage
  • Botanical: Salvia officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Sage, Altweiberschmecken, Edelsalbei, Echter Salbei, Garten-Salbei, Gschmackblatteln, Königssalbei, Kreuzsalbei, Muskatellerkraut, Sälvel, Salf, Salfat, Salser, Scharleikraut, Selve, Zaffe, Zuffen, Zupfblatteln
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius, sharp, spicy

Sage

Cultivars are quite variable in size, leaf and flower color, and foliage pattern, with many variegated leaf types. The Old World type grows to approximately 2 ft (0.61 m) tall and wide, with lavender flowers most common, though they can also be white, pink, or purple. The plant flowers in late spring or summer. The leaves are oblong, ranging in size up to 2.5 in (6.4 cm) long by 1 in (2.5 cm) wide.

Senna Alexandrian
  • Botanical: Senna alexandrina
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Cassia lanceolata, Egyptian Senna, Tinnevelly Senna, East Indian Senna, séné de la palthe, Alexandrinische Senna
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sweet

Senna Alexandrian

Alexandrian Senna is a shrubby plant that reaches 0.5–1, rarely two, metres in height with a branched, pale-green erect stem and long spreading branches bearing four or five pairs of leaves. These leaves form complex, feathery, mutual pairs. The leaflets vary from 4 to 6 pairs, fully edged, with a sharp top. The midribs are equally divided at the base of the leaflets. The flowers are in a raceme interior[verification needed] blossoms, big in size, coloured yellow that tends to brown. Its legume fruit are horned, broadly oblong, compressed and flat and contain about six seeds.

Soapbark
  • Botanical: Quillaja saponaria
  • Family: Quillajaceae
  • Known as: soap bark tree, soapbark, Quillaja
  • Old Use: medical, industry

Soapbark

It can grow to 15–20 m (50–65 ft) in height. The tree has thick, dark bark, smooth, leathery, shiny, oval evergreen leaves 3–5 cm long, white flowers 15 mm diameter borne in dense corymbs, and a dry fruit with five follicles each containing 10-20 seeds.

Spearmint
  • Botanical: Mentha spicata
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Spear Mint, Langblättrige Minze, Rossminze, Ross-Minze, Ährige Minze, Speer-Minze
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, minty

Spearmint

It is a herbaceous rhizomatous perennial plant growing 30–100 cm tall, with variably hairless to hairy stems and foliage, and a wide-spreading fleshy underground rhizome. The leaves are 5–9 cm long and 1.5–3 cm broad, with a serrated margin. The stem is square-shaped, a trademark of the mint family of herbs. Spearmint produces flowers in slender spikes, each flower pink or white, 2.5–3 mm long and broad.