• borst
  • lavender
  • dandelion

Skin & Hair

Saffron
  • Botanical: Crocus sativus
  • Family: Iridaceae
  • Known as: Safran, Saffron crocus,
  • Old Use: meidicinal use
  • Aroma: spicy

Saffron

The domesticated saffron crocus, Crocus sativus, is an autumn-flowering perennial plant unknown in the wild. Its progenitors are possibly the eastern Mediterranean autumn-flowering Crocus cartwrightianus, which is also known as "wild saffron" and originated in Greece. The saffron crocus likely resulted when C. cartwrightianus was subjected to extensive artificial selection by growers seeking longer stigmas. C. thomasii and C. pallasii are other possible sources.

Sage
  • Botanical: Salvia officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Sage, Altweiberschmecken, Edelsalbei, Echter Salbei, Garten-Salbei, Gschmackblatteln, Königssalbei, Kreuzsalbei, Muskatellerkraut, Sälvel, Salf, Salfat, Salser, Scharleikraut, Selve, Zaffe, Zuffen, Zupfblatteln
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: herbaceius, sharp, spicy

Sage

Cultivars are quite variable in size, leaf and flower color, and foliage pattern, with many variegated leaf types. The Old World type grows to approximately 2 ft (0.61 m) tall and wide, with lavender flowers most common, though they can also be white, pink, or purple. The plant flowers in late spring or summer. The leaves are oblong, ranging in size up to 2.5 in (6.4 cm) long by 1 in (2.5 cm) wide.

Sandalwood
  • Botanical: Santalum album
  • Family: Santalaceae
  • Known as: Santalum album, Indian sandalwood
  • Old Use: medicinal anc culinary use
  • Aroma: exotic, floral, spicy, sweet

Sandalwood

Sandalwood is derived from an Indian tree. Its fragrance is both heavy and earthy, but also the other lovely and sweet, a total of very exotic. In the sandalwood fragrance lamp spreads a warm, friendly indoor environment, releases the tension and makes the senses. Applied externally as a component of sandalwood creams for dry skin and helps relieve eczema.

Savin Juniper
  • Botanical: Juniperus sabina
  • Family: Cupressaceae
  • Known as: Savin, Sadebaum, Stink Wacholder, Gift Wacholder, Sefistrauch, Sebenstrauch
  • Old Use: Medicine, Insecticide, Parasiticide, Industry

Savin Juniper

The shrub is very variable in shape, up to 1–4 m tall. The leaves are of two forms, juvenile needle-like leaves 5–10 mm long, and adult scale-leaves 1–2 mm long on slender shoots 0.8–1 mm thick. Juvenile leaves are found mainly on seedlings but mature shrubs sometimes continue to bear some juvenile leaves as well as adult, particularly on shaded shoots low in the crown. It is largely dioecious with separate male and female plants, but some individual plants produce both sexes. The cones are berry-like, 5–9 mm in diameter, blue-black with a whitish waxy bloom, and contain 1-3 (rarely 4 or 5) seeds; they are mature in about 18 months. The male cones are 2–4 mm long, and shed their pollen in early spring.

Senega Snakeroot
  • Botanical: Polygala senega
  • Family: Polygalaceae
  • Known as: Senega Snakeroot, Senegaroot, Rattlesnake root, Mountain flax,
  • Old Use: medical

Senega Snakeroot

This species is a perennial herb with multiple stems up to 50 centimeters tall. The stems are usually unbranched, but some old plants can have branching stems. A mature plant can have up to 70 stems growing from a hard, woody rootstock that spreads horizontally. The lance-shaped leaves are alternately arranged. The lower leaves are reduced and scale-like. The inflorescence is a spike of rounded white or greenish flowers. The fruit is a capsule containing two hairy black seeds. The root is twisted and conical, with a scent somewhat like wintergreen and a very pungent taste. There are two root morphs; a northern morph growing in Canada and toward Minnesota has larger roots up to 15 centimeters long by 1.2 wide which are dark brown and sometimes purplish toward the top, and a southern morph found in the southeastern United States that has smaller, yellow-brown roots.

Sesame
  • Botanical: Sesamum orientale
  • Family: Pedaliacae
  • Known as: Sesam
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry

Sesame

Sesamum indicum is an annual plant, with an erect, pubescent, branching stem, 2 to 4 feet in height. The leaves are ovate-lanceolate, or oblong; the lower ones trilobed and sometimes ternate; the upper undivided, irregularly serrate and pointed. The flowers are of a pale-purple color, axillary, and borne on short glandular pedicels. The fruit is an oblong, mucronate, pubescent capsule, containing numerous small, oval, yellowish seeds

Soapbark
  • Botanical: Quillaja saponaria
  • Family: Quillajaceae
  • Known as: soap bark tree, soapbark, Quillaja
  • Old Use: medical, industry

Soapbark

It can grow to 15–20 m (50–65 ft) in height. The tree has thick, dark bark, smooth, leathery, shiny, oval evergreen leaves 3–5 cm long, white flowers 15 mm diameter borne in dense corymbs, and a dry fruit with five follicles each containing 10-20 seeds.

Suicide tree
  • Botanical: Cerbera odollam
  • Family: Apocynaceae
  • Known as: Pong-pong, Othalanga, Zerberusbaum, Selbstmordbaum, See-Mango

Suicide tree

Cerbera odollam is a large shrub or small tree reaching approximately 10 meters in height. Like its relative Cerbera manghas, it has alternate glossy shiny green leaves and fragrant white flowers, however the flowers have a yellow throat instead of red.

The fruits are green when young and turn bright red at maturity. The dried fruits (drupes) are 5-10 cm in length. When they fall from the branches, the papery, outer layer falls off exposing a thick fibrous husk. Because of this fibrous layer, the fruits are very light and buoyant, being easily dispersed by ocean currents. The fruits separate into two halves, each containing one very poisonous seed.

Sweet Iris
  • Botanical: Iris pallida
  • Family: Iridaceae
  • Known as: Dalmatian iris, Bleiche Schwertlilie, Dalmatinische Iris
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: floral

Sweet Iris

This iris prefers rocky places in the mediterranean and submediterranean zone and reaches sometimes montane regions at its southern range in Montenegro. It grows to a stem height of 50 to 80 centimeters. The leaves are bluish-green in color, and sword-shaped, 40 to 50 centimeters in length, and 2.5 to 3 centimeters in width. The inflorescence, produced in May/June, is fan-shaped and contains two or three flowers which are usually pale purplish to whitish.

Tolu Balsam
  • Botanical: Myroxylon balsamum
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Tolu Balsam, Myroxylon balsamum, Balsam of Tolu, Balsam of Peru, Myroxylon, Perubalsam, Balsambäume, Cabreúva, Cabreuva, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Quina, Balsamo
  • Old Use: medicinal, culinary
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy, sweet, warm

Tolu Balsam

The trees are large, growing to 40 metres (130 ft) tall, with evergreen pinnate leaves 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, with 5–13 leaflets. The flowers are white with yellow stamens, produced in racemes. The fruit is a pod 7–11 centimetres (2.8–4.3 in) long, containing a single seed.

The wood is dark brown, with a deep red heartwood. Natural oils grant it excellent decay resistance. In fact, it is also resistant to preservative treatment. Its specific gravity is 0.74 to 0.81.

Tormentil
  • Botanical: Potentilla erecta
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Known as: Septfoil, Blutwurz, Dilledapp, Durmentill, Natterwurz, Rotwurz, Ruhrwurz, Siebenfinger, Tormentill
  • Old Use: medicine, culinary, industry

Tormentil

Potentilla erecta is a low, clump-forming plant with slender, procumbent to arcuately upright stalks, growing 10–30 centimetres (3.9–11.8 in) tall and with non-rooting runners. It grows wild predominantly in Scandinavia, Europe, and western Asia mostly on acid soils in a wide variety of habitats, such as mountains, heaths, meadows, sandy soils and dunes.This plant is flowering from May to August/September. There is one yellow, 7–11 millimetres (0.28–0.43 in) wide flower, growing at the tip of a long stalk. There are almost always four notched petals, each with a length between 3 and 6 mm. Four petals are rather uncommon in the rose family. The petals are somewhat longer than the sepals. There are 20–25 stamens. The radical leaves have a long petiole, while the leaves on the flowering stalks are usually sessile or with short petioles. The glossy leaves are alternate, ternate, consisting of three obovate leaflets with serrate margins. The paired stipules are leaflike and palmately lobed. There are 2–8 dry, inedible fruits.

Walnut
  • Botanical: Juglans nigra
  • Family: Juglandaceae
  • Known as: Walnut, Juglans, Juglans regia, Wallnuss, Wälsche Nuss, Welschnuss-Baum, Nussbaum, Christnuss, Steinnuss
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: forest, earthy

Walnut

The tree grows to a height of 40 or 60 feet, with a large spreading top, and thick, massive stem. One accurately measured by Professor du Breuil, in Normandy, was upwards of 23 feet in circumference; and in some parts of France there are Walnut trees 300 years old, with stems of much greater thickness. In the southern parts of England the trees grow vigorously and bear abundantly, when not injured by late frosts in spring.