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Chamomile Stinking

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  • Botanical: Anthemis cotula
  • Family: Asteraceae
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Chamomile Stinking

Botanical

Anthemis cotula

Family

Asteraceae

Known as

Chamomile, Kamille, Matricaria chamomilla, German chamomile

Collection Times

May to June (During Sun)

Parts Used

flowers, leaves

Heart & Circulation

blood forming

Hormone & Sexual Organs

cramps, herpes, menopausal symptom

Infection & Inflammation

fever, immunity, toothache

Muscle & Joints

arthritis, rheumatism

Mind & Nerves

insomnia, migraine, neuralgia, nervousness, pain relief, stress relief

Respiratory System

asthma

Stomach & Intestinal

constipation, cystitis, diarrhea, digestion, flatulence, liver weakness, indigestion, kidney weakness, stomach cramps, worm

Skin & Hair

acne, boils, dermatitis, perspiration (sweating), psoriasis, wounds

Properties

analgesic, antibacterial, antispasmodic, antidepressant, anti inflammatory, carminative, cholagogue, diuretic, fungicide

Note

middle

Extraction

steam distillation

Description

Anthemis cotula is an annual glandular plant with a harsh taste and an acrid smell. Its height varies from 12 inches (28 centimeters) to 24 inches (56 centimeters).
The leaves of the plant sometimes have very fine and soft hairs on the upper surface, although the plant is mostly hairless. There is no leaf stalk; leaves grow immediately from the stems. The leaves are pinnate in shape, with many extremely thin lobes, and can be around 1 or 2 inches long (2.5 to 5 centimeters).

Each stem is topped by a single flower head which is usually around 1 inch (2.34 centimeters) in diameter. The flower head is encompassed by between 10 and 18 white ray florets, each with a three-toothed shape; the florets tend to curve downwards around the edges and may occasionally have pistils, although these do not produce fruit. Beneath the flower proper, oval bracts of the plant form an involucre, with soft hairs on each; further bracts are bristled and sit at right angles to the flowers.

The fruits are achenes (with no pappus). They are wrinkled, ribbed with ten ridges, and have small glandular bumps across the surface.

Properties & Uses

It is closely related to camomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers. 

Other Uses

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

Traditional Use

Medicinal use:

Mayweed is closely related to camomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers

Cautions

The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people

Distribution

Most of Europe, including Britain, east to North and West Asia.

Constituents

n-nonadecane (10.8%), cedrane (9.2%), a -farnesene (6%), 1-eicosane (11%), benzyl salicylate (8.9%) and aromadendrene (7.1%)