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Mullein Orange

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  • Botanical: Verbascum phlomoides
  • Family: Scrophulariaceae
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Mullein Orange

Botanical

Verbascum phlomoides

Family

Scrophulariaceae

Known as

Verbascum thapsiforme, Königskerze

Collection Times

July to August

Parts Used

flowers, leaves, roots

Respiratory System

asthma, cough

Stomach & Intestinal

gastrointestinal

Properties

antiseptic, diuretic, expectorant, vermifuge

Description

They are biennial or perennial plants, rarely annuals or subshrubs, growing to 0.5–3 m tall. The plants first form a dense rosette of leaves at ground level, subsequently sending up a tall flowering stem. Biennial plants form the rosette the first year and the stem the following season. The leaves are spirally arranged, often densely hairy, though glabrous (hairless) in some species. The flowers have five symmetrical petals; petal colours in different species include yellow (most common), orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous minute seeds.

Properties & Uses

The flowers and leaves are anodyne, antiseptic, astringent, demulcent, emollient, expectorant, pectoral and vulnerary. An infusion is used internally in the treatment of various respiratory complaints including coughs, bronchitis, asthma and throat irritations. An infusion of the fresh or dried flowers in olive oil is used to treat earaches, sores, wounds, boils etc. The plant is harvested when in flower and should be dried quickly and with care or it will lose its medicinal qualities. 

Other Uses

The whole plant is used to repel mice and rats

Traditional Use

It is considered of much value in phthisis and other wasting diseases, palliating the cough and staying expectoration.
The dried leaves are sometimes smoked in an ordinary tobacco pipe to relieve the irritation of the respiratory mucus membranes, and will completely control, it is said, the hacking cough of consumption. They can be employed with equal benefit when made into cigarettes, for asthma and spasmodic coughs in general.

Fomentations and poultices of the leaves have been found serviceable in haemorrhoidal complaints.

 Mullein is said to be of much value in diarrhoea, from its combination of demulcent with astringent properties, by this combination strengthening the bowels at the same time.  

A conserve of the flowers has also been employed on the Continent against ringworm, and a distilled water of the flowers was long reputed a cure for burns and erysipelas.

 An oil produced by macerating Mullein flowers is used as a local application for piles and other mucus membrane inflammation, and also for frost bites and bruises. Mullein oil is recommended for earache and discharge from the ear, and for any eczema of the external ear and its canal. 

 

Cautions

None known

Distribution

South Europe. Rarely naturalized in Britain

Constituents

Saponins, mucilage, flavonoids, essential oils

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.