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Flower | Plant Lexica

Flower

Heartsease
  • Botanical: Viola tricolor
  • Family: Viola tricolor
  • Known as: heartsease, heart's ease, heart's delight, tickle my fancy, Jack jump up and kiss me, come and cuddle me, three faces in a hood, love in idleness, Wildes Stiefmütterchen, Stiefmütterchen, Ackerveilchen, Muttergottesschuh, Mädchenaugen, Gedenkemein
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: fruity, herbaceius

Heartsease

The Heartsease is as variable as any of the other members of the genus, but whatever modifications of form it may present, it may always be readily distinguished from the other Violets by the general form of its foliage, which is much more cut up than in any of the other species and by the very large leafy stipules at the base of the true leaves. The stem, too, branches more than is commonly found in the other members of the genus. Besides the free branching of the stem, which is mostly 4 to 8 inches in height, it is generally very angular. The leaves are deeply cut into rounded lobes, the terminal one being considerably the largest. In the other species of Viola the foliage is ordinarily very simple in outline, heartshaped, or kidney-shaped, having its edge finely toothed. The flowers (1/4 to 1 1/4 inch across) vary a great deal in colour and size, but are either purple, yellow or white, and most commonly there is a combination of all these colours in each blossom. The upper petals are generally most showy in colour and purple in tint, while the lowest and broadest petal is usually a more or less deep tint of yellow. The base of the lowest petal is elongated into a spur, as in the Violet. The flowers are in due course succeeded by the little capsules of seeds, which when ripe, open by three valves. Though a near relative of the Violet, it does not produce any of the curious bud-like flowers - cleistogamous flowers - characteristic of the Violet, as its ordinary showy flowers manage to come to fruition so that there is no necessity for any others. Darwin found that the humble bee was the commonest insect visitor of the Heartsease, though the moth Pluvia visited it largely - another observer mentions Thrips small wingless insects - as frequent visitors to the flowers. Darwin considered that the cultivated Pansy rarely set seed if there were no insect visitors, but that the little Field Pansy can certainly fertilize itself if necessary. The flower protects itself from rain and dew by drooping its head both at night and in wet weather, and thus the back of the flower and not its face receives the moisture.

Hollyhock
  • Botanical: Althaea rosea
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Common Hollyhock, Bauerneibisch, Baummalve, Gartenmalve, Herbstrose, Pappelrose, Roseneibisch, Schwarze Malve, Stockmalve, Winterrose
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Hollyhock

It is a tall, upright perennial has single flowers of various colors that grow along a spike. It blooms in early summer and midsummer.

A. rosea is a robust biennial or short-lived perennial to 2m or more, with shallowly lobed, rounded leaves and long erect racemes of open funnel-shaped flowers to 10cm across, which may be pink, purple, red, white or yellow

Jalape
  • Botanical: Ipomoea purga
  • Family: Convolvulaceae
  • Known as: Mexikanische Purgierwinde
  • Old Use: medical

Jalape

Ipomoea purga is described as a vine that can reach heights of 12 feet. When fresh, the root is black externally, white and milky within, and varies in size according to its age. It has heart shaped flowers and purple trumpet like leaves. Ipomoea purga is rather difficult to break down, but if triturated with cream of tartar, sugar of milk, or other hard salts, the process of pulverization is much easier, and the powder rendered much finer. When in powder form in order to ingest, the color is a pale grayish-brown

Lavender
  • Botanical: Lavendula officinalis
  • Family: Lamiaceae
  • Known as: Lavendel, Lavandula angustifolia,
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary

Lavender

The genus includes annual or short-lived herbaceous perennial plants, and suffrutescent perennials, subshrubs or small shrubs.

Leaf shape is diverse across the genus. They are simple in some commonly cultivated species; in others they are pinnately toothed, or pinnate, sometimes multiple pinnate and dissected. In most species the leaves are covered in fine hairs or indumentum, which normally contain the essential oils.

Lesser Butterfly Orchid
  • Botanical: Platanthera bifolia
  • Family: Orchidaceae
  • Known as: Zweiblättrige Waldhyazinthe, Weiß-Waldhyazinthe, Weiße Waldhyazinthe
  • Old Use: culinary, medical
  • Aroma: sharp, sweet

Lesser Butterfly Orchid

Lesser butterfly-orchids are not to be confused with the greater butterfly-orchid, which are about the same size. Lesser butterfly-orchids are distinguished by their two shining green basal leaves, especially of the hill form, which are shorter and broader and by the angle of the pollinia.The upper sepal and petals form a loose triangular hood above the pollinia, which lie parallel and close together, obscuring the opening into the spur, which is long and almost straight. There are usually around 25 white flowers tinged with yellow-green in a slim flower spike. The flowers are night-scented, but the chemical components of the scent are different from those of greater butterfly-orchid and attract different pollinators.

Lettuce Bitter
  • Botanical: Lactuca virosa
  • Family: Asteraceae
  • Known as: Bitter Lettuce, Lactuca virosa, Wild Lettuce, Bitter lettuce, Laitue vireuse, Opium Lettuce, Poisonous Lettuce, Rakutu-Karyumu-So, Gift-Lattich, Wilder Lattich, Stinklattich, Stinksalat

Lettuce Bitter

It is a biennial herb growing to a maximum height of 6 feet. The erect stem, springing from a brown tap-root, is smooth and pale green, sometimes spotted with purple. There are a few prickles on the lower part and short horizontal branches above. The numerous, large, radical leaves are from 6 to 18 inches long, entire, and obovate-oblong. The stem leaves are scanty, alternate, and small, clasping the stem with two small lobes.

Lily of the Valley
  • Botanical: Convallaria majalis
  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Known as: Augenkraut, Chaldron, Faldron, Galleieli, Glasblümli, Herrenblümli, Maiblume, Maiblümchen, Maienlilie, Maizauken, Marienglöckchen, Marienriesli, Niesekraut, Schillerlilie, Schneetropfen, Springauf, Tallilie, Zaucken

Lily of the Valley

C. majalis is a herbaceous perennial plant that forms extensive colonies by spreading underground stems called rhizomes. New upright shoots are formed at the ends of stolons in summer, these upright dormant stems are often called pips. These grow in the spring into new leafy shoots that still remain connected to the other shoots under ground, often forming extensive colonies. The stems grow to 15–30 cm tall, with one or two leaves 10–25 cm long, flowering stems have two leaves and a raceme of 5–15 flowers on the stem apex.

Military Orchid
  • Botanical: Orchis militaris
  • Family: Orchidaceae
  • Known as: Helm-Knabenkraut, Salep. Saloop. Sahlep. Satyrion. Levant Salep.
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: sweet

Military Orchid

This plant grows to a height of 20 to 50 cm with a robust stem with rather drawn up oblong basal leaves. The inflorescence forms a purplish dense cone consisting of from 10 to 40 flowers. In each flower the sepals and side petals are gathered together to form a pointed "helmet" (whence it gets its name), a lilac colour outside and a veined purple colour inside. The central tongue finishes in two lobes separated by a tooth.

Mullein Orange
  • Botanical: Verbascum phlomoides
  • Family: Scrophulariaceae
  • Known as: Verbascum thapsiforme, Königskerze

Mullein Orange

They are biennial or perennial plants, rarely annuals or subshrubs, growing to 0.5–3 m tall. The plants first form a dense rosette of leaves at ground level, subsequently sending up a tall flowering stem. Biennial plants form the rosette the first year and the stem the following season. The leaves are spirally arranged, often densely hairy, though glabrous (hairless) in some species. The flowers have five symmetrical petals; petal colours in different species include yellow (most common), orange, red-brown, purple, blue, or white. The fruit is a capsule containing numerous minute seeds.

Mustard Black
  • Botanical: Brassica nigra
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Black Mustard, Brassica nigra, Sinapis nigra, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard Black

Brassica nigra is a ANNUAL growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in). It grows from two to eight feet tall, with racemes of small yellow flowers. These flowers are usually up to 1/3" across, with four petals each. The leaves are covered in small hairs; they can wilt on hot days, but recover at night.
 It is in flower from Jun to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies.The plant is self-fertile.

Mustard India
  • Botanical: Brassica juncea
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Indian Mustard, Brassica juncea, Mustard Greens, Chinese mustard, Braune Senf, Indischer Senf, Sareptasenf, Ruten-Kohl, Chinesischer Senf
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Mustard India

It is an erect annual, 3 feet or more in height, with smaller flowers than the White Mustard. The spear-shaped, upper leaves, linear, pointed, entire and smooth, and the shortly-beaked pods, readily distinguish it from the former species. The smooth, erect flattened pods, each provided with a short slender beak, contain about ten to twelve dark reddish-brown or black seeds, which are collected when ripe and dried.

Mustard White
  • Botanical: Sinapis alba
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: White Mustard, Sinapis alba, Yellow Mustard, Brassica alba, B. hirta, Weisser Senf, Gelbsenf, Weißsenf, Gartensenf, Mostardkorn, Mostert, Senfsaat
  • Old Use: cooking and medicinal use

Mustard White

It is an erect annual, 3 feet or more in height, with smaller flowers than the White Mustard. The spear-shaped, upper leaves, linear, pointed, entire and smooth, and the shortly-beaked pods, readily distinguish it from the former species. The smooth, erect flattened pods, each provided with a short slender beak, contain about ten to twelve dark reddish-brown or black seeds, which are collected when ripe and dried.

Poppy Corn
  • Botanical: Papaver rhoeas
  • Family: Papaveraceae
  • Known as: Common Poppy, Corn Poppy, Corn Rose, Field Poppy, Flanders Poppy, Red Poppy, Red Weed, Klatschmohn, Blutblume, Feldmohn, Feuerblume, Feuer-Mohn, Flattermohn, Klatschrose, Kornrose, Schnalle, Wolder Mohn
  • Old Use: cooking; medical

Poppy Corn

The plant is an annual herb which readily germinates from seeds. The branching stems have fine white or purple-red hair all along, especially at the flowering part. The flower stems are quite slender, and holds the solitary and terminal flowers. The bud is hanged upside down and then assumes a normal position just before blossoming. The stems have a white milky sap.

Poppy Opium
  • Botanical: Papaver somniferum
  • Family: Papaveraceae
  • Known as: White Poppy, Red Poppy, Opium Poppy, Schlafmohn
  • Old Use: treating asthma, stomach illnesses, and bad eyesight

Poppy Opium

The plant is an erect, herbaceous annual, varying much in the color of its flowers, as well as in the shape of the fruit and colour of the seeds. All parts of the plant, but particularly the walls of the capsules, or seed-vessels, contain a system of laticiferous vessels, filled with a white latex.

 

Rape
  • Botanical: Brassica napus
  • Family: Brassicaceae
  • Known as: Rape, Brassica napus, Oilseed Rape, Rapa, Rappi, Rapaseed, Canola,
  • Aroma: fresh

Rape

The White Mustard is an erect annual, about a foot or more in height, with pinnatifid leaves and large, yellow, cruciferous flowers. It closely resembles the Black Mustard, but is smaller. The fruit of the two plants differs considerably in shape, those of the White Mustard being more or less horizontal and hairy, while Black Mustard pods are erect and smooth. The pods of White Mustard are spreading, roundish pods, ribbed and swollen where the seeds are situated, and provided with a very large flattened, swordshaped beak at the end.

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