Tree

Buckthorn Purshs
  • Botanical: Rhamnus purshiana
  • Family: Rhamnaceae
  • Known as: cascara buckthorn, cascara, bearberry,
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry

Buckthorn Purshs

Cascara is a large shrub or small tree 4.5–10 m tall, with a trunk 20–50 cm in diameter. The outer bark is brownish to silver-grey with light splotching (often, in part, from lichens) and the inner surface of the bark is smooth and yellowish (turning dark brown with age and/or exposure to sunlight). Cascara bark has an intensely bitter flavor that will remain in the mouth for hours, overpowering the taste buds. The leaves are simple, deciduous, alternate, clustered near the ends of twigs. They are oval, 5–15 cm long and 2–5 cm broad with a 0.6–2 cm petiole, shiny and green on top, and a dull, paler green below; and have tiny teeth on the margins, and parallel veins. Leaves, flower, and young fruits of R. purshiana The flowers are tiny, 4–5 mm diameter, with five greenish yellow petals, forming a cup shape. The flowers bloom in umbel-shaped clusters, on the ends of distinctive peduncles that are attached to the leaf axils. The flowering season is brief, from early to mid- spring, disappearing by early summer. The fruit is a drupe 6–10 mm diameter, bright red at first, quickly maturing deep purple or black, and containing a yellow pulp, and two or three hard, smooth, olive-green or black seeds

Cacao
  • Botanical: Theobroma cacao
  • Family: Malvaceae
  • Known as: Cacao, Cocoa, Theobroma cacao, Kakao
  • Old Use: ceremonial, medicinal, culinary

Cacao

Leaves are alternate, entire, unlobed, 10–40 cm (3.9–15.7 in) long and 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) broad.

The flowers are produced in clusters directly on the trunk and older branches; this is known as cauliflory. The flowers are small, 1–2 cm (0.39–0.79 in) diameter, with pink calyx. While many of the world's flowers are pollinated by bees (Hymenoptera) or butterflies/moths (Lepidoptera), cacao flowers are pollinated by tiny flies, Forcipomyia midges in the order Diptera.

Cajeput
  • Botanical: Melaleuca leucadendra
  • Family: Myrtaceae
  • Known as: Cajuput Tree, Cajeput, Silberbaum Myrtenheide, Kajeputbaum, Melaleukaöl, Cajeputbaum
  • Old Use: medicinal use

Cajeput

The tree has a long flexible trunk with irregular ascending branches, covered with a pale thick, lamellated bark it is soft and spongy and from time to time throws off its outer layer in flakes; leaves entire, linear, lanceolate, ash colour, alternate on short foot-stalks; flowers sessile, white, on a long spike.

Camphor
  • Botanical: Cinnamomum camphora
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: Camphor tree, Camphorwood, camphor laurel, Kampfer, Kampferlorbeer
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: camphorus

Camphor

Cinnamomum camphora is a small, glabrous tree. Leaves alternate and penniverved with stout dormant buds enclosed in large, silky orbicular concave, imbricating caducous scales. Flowers in lax axillary, terminal panicles on the ends of the twigs, creamy white in colour, hermaphroditic, actinomorphic; ovary 1, locular; ovule 1, pendulous or basal; stamens definite, free; anthers opening by valves or slits; embryo minute.

Cashew
  • Botanical: Anacardium occidentale
  • Family: Anacardiaceae
  • Known as: Cajueiro, cashew, cashu, casho, acajuiba, caju, acajou, acaju, acajaiba, alcayoiba, anacarde, anacardier, anacardo, cacajuil, cajou, gajus, jocote maranon, maranon, merey, noix d’acajou, pomme cajou, pomme, jambu, jambu golok, jambu mete, jambu monyet
  • Old Use: medicinal; culinary
  • Aroma: sweet

Cashew

The tree is large and evergreen, growing to 10-12m (~32 ft) tall, with a short, often irregularly shaped trunk. The leaves are spirally arranged, leathery textured, elliptic to obovate, 4 to 22 cm long and 2 to 15 cm broad, with smooth margins. The flowers are produced in a panicle or corymb up to 26 cm long, each flower is small, pale green at first, then turning reddish, with five slender, acute petals 7 to 15 mm long.

Cherry Sour
  • Botanical: Prunus cerasus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Known as: Cherry, Vogelkirsche, Süsskirsche, Sauerkirsche, Weichselkirsche, Morellen

Cherry Sour

The tree is smaller than the sweet cherry (growing to a height of 4–10 m), has twiggy branches, and its crimson-to-near-black cherries are borne upon shorter stalks.

The leaves near the base of the stem are large and numerous, 6 to 8 inches long and 2 to 2 1/2 inches broad, but become smaller as they ascend the stem, on which they are arranged not opposite to one another, but on alternate sides.

Chestnut
  • Botanical: Castanea sativa
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • Known as: Castanea vesca, Castanea vulgaris, Sweet chestnut, Maroni, Marone, Esskastanie, Essbare Kastanie, Echte Kastanie, Cheste, Cheschtene, Keschte, Edelkastanie

Chestnut

C. sativa attains a height of 20–35 m (66–115 ft) with a trunk often 2 m (7 ft) in diameter. The bark often has a net-shaped (retiform) pattern with deep furrows or fissures running spirally in both directions up the trunk. The oblong-lanceolate, boldly toothed leaves are 16–28 cm (6–11 in) long and 5–9 cm (2–4 in) broad.

Cinnamon
  • Botanical: Cinnamomum verum, Cinnamomum zeylanicum
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: Cinnamon, Zimt, Ceylon Zimt, Kanel
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: oriental, spicy, sweet

Cinnamon

Cinnamomum verum trees are 10–15 metres (32.8–49.2 feet) tall. The leaves are ovate-oblong in shape, 7–18 cm (2.75–7.1 inches) long. The flowers, which are arranged in panicles, have a greenish color, and have a distinct odor. The fruit is a purple 1-cm drupe containing a single seed

Clove
  • Botanical: Syzygium aromaticum, Caryophyllus aromaticus
  • Family: Myrtaceae
  • Known as: Cloves, Gewürznelken, Negelken, Nägelein
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: spicy, smoky, sweet

Clove

The clove tree is an evergreen that grows up to 8–12 m tall, with large leaves and sanguine flowers grouped in terminal clusters. The flower buds initially have a pale hue, gradually turn green, then transition to a bright red when ready for harvest. Cloves are harvested at 1.5–2.0 cm long, and consist of a long calyx that terminates in four spreading sepals, and four unopened petals that form a small central ball.

Coconut
  • Botanical: Cocos nucifera
  • Family: Arecaceae
  • Known as: Cocoanut, Coconut Palm,
  • Aroma: exotic

Coconut

Cocos nucifera is a large palm, growing up to 30 m (98 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves 4–6 m (13–20 ft) long, and pinnae 60–90 cm long; old leaves break away cleanly, leaving the trunk smooth. Coconuts are generally classified into two general types: tall and dwarf. On very fertile land, a tall coconut palm tree can yield up to 75 fruits per year, but more often yields less than 30, mainly due to poor cultural practices. In recent years, improvements in cultivation practices and breeding have produced coconut trees that can yield more.

Coffee
  • Botanical: Coffea arabica
  • Family: Rubiaceae
  • Known as: Caffea
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: fresh, sharp

Coffee

Wild plants grow to between 9 and 12 m (29 and 39 ft) tall, and have an open branching system; the leaves are opposite, simple elliptic-ovate to oblong, 6–12 cm (2.4–4.8 in) long and 4–8 cm (1.6–3.2 in) broad, glossy dark green. The flowers are white, 10–15 mm in diameter and grow in axillary clusters. The fruit is a drupe (though commonly called a "cherry"; the plural form is simply "cherry" - used only when referring to the fruit of C. arabica - when referring to the actual cherry fruit, the appropriate plural is "cherries") 10–15 mm in diameter, maturing bright red to purple and typically contains two seeds (the coffee seeds).

Copaiba
  • Botanical: Copaifera officinalis
  • Family: Leguminosae
  • Known as: Copaiva. Balsam Copaiba. Copaiba officinalis.
  • Old Use: medical
  • Aroma: balsamic

Copaiba

Copaifera Officinalis (copaiba) is a well branched tropical tree that grows up to 100 feet tall. It has pinnate leathery leaves and blossoms are borne in whitish racemes; the flowers are white, small and aromatic. The fruit is a coriaceous legume containing only a single seed. The part of the copaiba tree that is used is the oleoresin (a clear yellow resin) accumulated in cavities within the trunk; it is obtained by making incisions in the tree trunk. Although this resin is referred to as a balsam, in reality it is more a natural oil; thick clear pale - to golden yellow color

Cork Oak
  • Botanical: Quercus suber
  • Family: Fagaceae
  • Known as: Korkeiche, Sorbriero
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry
  • Aroma: sweet

Cork Oak

It grows to up to 20 m (66 ft), although it is typically more stunted in its native environment. The leaves are 4 to 7 cm (1.6 to 2.8 in) long, weakly lobed or coarsely toothed, dark green above, paler beneath, with the leaf margins often downcurved. The acorns are 2 to 3 cm (0.79 to 1.18 in) long, in a deep cup fringed with elongated scales.

Dipterocarpus
  • Botanical: Dipterocarpus retusus
  • Family: Dipterocarpaceae
  • Known as: Zweiflügelfruchtbäume, Zweiflügelnüsse, Flügelfruchtbäume
  • Old Use: medical, manufacturing

Dipterocarpus

he tree, some 20-30m tall, is found in Cambodia in dense forests of the plains, common on hillsides and along rivers and in forests between 800m and 1500m altitude

Elder
  • Botanical: Sambucus nigra
  • Family: Adoxaceae
  • Known as: Holler, Hollunder, Schwarzer Holunder, Flieder,
  • Aroma: clean, citrus, floral, fresh, fruity

Elder

It is a deciduous shrub or small tree growing to 6 m (20 ft) tall and wide (rarely 10m tall). The bark, light grey when young, changes to a coarse grey outer bark with lengthwise furrowing. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, 10–30 cm long, pinnate with five to seven (rarely nine) leaflets, the leaflets 5–12 cm long and 3–5 cm broad, with a serrated margin.

Welcome to plantlexica.com

Your Medical Plant Guide

We are continuesly expanding our plant database.
Our goal is to collect all the information of benifitial and medicinal plants and share it.

Help and support us comleting our mission. See how here.

beta v1 - a opassoap.com project