Tree

Sandalwood
  • Botanical: Santalum album
  • Family: Santalaceae
  • Known as: Santalum album, Indian sandalwood
  • Old Use: medicinal anc culinary use
  • Aroma: exotic, floral, spicy, sweet

Sandalwood

Sandalwood is derived from an Indian tree. Its fragrance is both heavy and earthy, but also the other lovely and sweet, a total of very exotic. In the sandalwood fragrance lamp spreads a warm, friendly indoor environment, releases the tension and makes the senses. Applied externally as a component of sandalwood creams for dry skin and helps relieve eczema.

Sandalwood Red
  • Botanical: Pterocarpus santalinus
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Pterocarpus santalinus, Red Sanders, Red Sandalwood, Rakta chandana, Sandelholz, Santelholz, Santalholz, lignum santalinum, lignum santali, bois de santal
  • Old Use: medicinal

Sandalwood Red

A small tree 20 to 30 feet high, with many opposite slender drooping branches, bark smooth grey-brown. Young twigs glabrous; leaves opposite, without stipules, petiole slender, about 1/2 inch long, blade 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches long, oval, ovate-oval or lanceolate, acute or obtuse at apex, tapering at base into petiole entire, smooth on both sides, glaucous beneath.

Sassafras
  • Botanical: Sassafras albidum
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Known as: White Sassafras, Red Sassafras, Silky Sassafras, Sassafrasbaum, Fenchelholzbaum, Nelkenzimtbaum
  • Old Use: medical, culinary, industry

Sassafras

It is a medium-sized deciduous tree growing to 15–20 m tall, with a trunk up to 60 cm diameter, and a crown with many slender branches. The bark on trunk of mature trees is thick, dark red-brown, and deeply furrowed. The branching is sympodial. The shoots are bright yellow green at first with mucilaginous bark, turning reddish brown, and in two or three years begin to show shallow fissures. The leaves are alternate, green to yellow-green, ovate or obovate, 10–16 cm long and 5–10 cm broad with a short, slender, slightly grooved petiole. They come in three different shapes, all of which can be on the same branch; three-lobed leaves, unlobed elliptical leaves, and two-lobed leaves; rarely, there can be more than three lobes. In fall, they turn to shades of yellow, tinged with red. The flowers are produced in loose, drooping, few-flowered racemes up to 5 cm long in early spring shortly before the leaves appear; they are yellow to greenish-yellow, with five or six tepals. It is usually dioecious, with male and female flowers on separate trees; male flowers have nine stamens, female flowers with six staminodes (aborted stamens) and a 2–3 mm style on a superior ovary. Pollination is by insects. The fruit is a dark blue-black drupe 1 cm long containing a single seed, borne on a red fleshy club-shaped pedicel 2 cm long; it is ripe in late summer, with the seeds dispersed by birds. The cotyledons are thick and fleshy. All parts of the plant are aromatic and spicy. The roots are thick and fleshy, and frequently produce root sprouts which can develop into new trees.

Savin Juniper
  • Botanical: Juniperus sabina
  • Family: Cupressaceae
  • Known as: Savin, Sadebaum, Stink Wacholder, Gift Wacholder, Sefistrauch, Sebenstrauch
  • Old Use: Medicine, Insecticide, Parasiticide, Industry

Savin Juniper

The shrub is very variable in shape, up to 1–4 m tall. The leaves are of two forms, juvenile needle-like leaves 5–10 mm long, and adult scale-leaves 1–2 mm long on slender shoots 0.8–1 mm thick. Juvenile leaves are found mainly on seedlings but mature shrubs sometimes continue to bear some juvenile leaves as well as adult, particularly on shaded shoots low in the crown. It is largely dioecious with separate male and female plants, but some individual plants produce both sexes. The cones are berry-like, 5–9 mm in diameter, blue-black with a whitish waxy bloom, and contain 1-3 (rarely 4 or 5) seeds; they are mature in about 18 months. The male cones are 2–4 mm long, and shed their pollen in early spring.

Sea Mango
  • Botanical: Cerbera tanghin
  • Family: Apocynaceae
  • Known as: Cerbera manghas, Tanghin poison nut,
  • Old Use: cardiac disorders, scabies and itching

Sea Mango

Cerbera manghas is a small evergreen coastal tree growing up 12 m tall. The the shiny dark-green leaves
are alternate, ovoid in shape. The flowers are fragrant, possessing a white, tubular, 5 lobed corolla about 3 to 5 cm in diameter, with a pink to red throat. There are 5 stamens, and the ovary is positioned above the other flower parts. The fruits are egg-shaped, 5 to 10 cm long, and turn purple-red at maturity
Spruce
  • Botanical: Picea abies
  • Family: Pinaceae
  • Known as: Norway Spruce, Spruce, Picea abies, Feichten, Gräne, Krestling, Pechtanne, Rothtanne, Rottanne, Schwarztanne
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: balsamic, smoky, sweet, woody

Spruce

It is a large, fast-growing evergreen coniferous tree growing 35–55 m (115–180 ft) tall and with a trunk diameter of 1 to 1.5 m. It can grow fast when young, up to 1 m (3 ft) per year for the first 25 years under good conditions, but becomes slower once over 20 m (66 ft) tall. The shoots are orange-brown and glabrous (hairless). The leaves are needle-like, 12–24 mm long, quadrangular in cross-section (not flattened), and dark green on all four sides with inconspicuous stomatal lines.

Strychnine tree
  • Botanical: Strychnos nux-vomica
  • Family: Loganiaceae
  • Known as: nux vomica, poison nut, semen strychnos, quaker buttons, Gewöhnliche Brechnuss, Brechnuss, Krähenaugenbaum, Strychninbaum, Brechnussbaum
  • Old Use: medical

Strychnine tree

S. nux-vomica is a medium-sized tree with a short thick trunk. The wood is dense, hard white, and close-grained. The branches are irregular and are covered with a smooth ashen bark. The young shoots are a deep green colour with a shiny coat. The leaves have an opposite decussate arrangement, short stalked, are oval shaped, also have a shiny coat and are smooth on both sides. The leaves are about 4 inches (10 cm) long and 3 inches (7.6 cm) wide. The flowers are small with a pale green colour with a funnel shape. They bloom in the cold season and have a foul smell. The fruit are about the size of a large apple with a smooth and hard shell which when ripened is a mild shade orange colour. The flesh of the fruit is soft and white with a jelly-like pulp containing five seeds covered with a soft woolly substance. The seeds are removed from the fruit when ripe. They are then cleaned, dried and sorted.

The seeds have the shape of a flattened disk completely covered with hairs radiating from the center of the sides. This gives the seeds a very characteristic sheen. The seeds are very hard, with a dark grey horny endosperm where the small embryo is housed that gives off no odour but possesses a very bitter taste.

Styrax
  • Botanical: Styrax benzoin
  • Family: Styracaceae
  • Known as: styrax, Benzoin, gum benjamin tree, loban, kemenyan, onycha, Siam benzoin, sumatra benzoin tree, Sumatra benzoin, Styrax tonkinensis, Benzoe, Storaxbaum
  • Old Use: used in perfumes, certain types of incense, and medicines.

Styrax

Large tropical tree up to 50 to 70 feet high, with pale green citrus-like leaves. It releases a balsamic resin when the trunk is cut. The resin hardens on exposure to air.

Tamarind
  • Botanical: Tamarindus indica
  • Family: Leguminosae
  • Known as: Tamarindenbaum, Indische Dattel, Sauerdattel
  • Old Use: medical, induscty
  • Aroma: sweet

Tamarind

The tamarind is a long-lived, medium-growth, bushy tree, which attains a maximum crown height of 12 to 18 metres (40 to 60 feet). The crown has an irregular, vase-shaped outline of dense foliage. The tree grows well in full sun in clay, loam, sandy, and acidic soil types, with a high drought and aerosol salt (wind-borne salt as found in coastal areas) resistance. Leaves are evergreen, bright green in color, elliptical ovular, arrangement is alternate, of the pinnately compound type, with pinnate venation and less than 5 cm (2 inches) in length. The branches droop from a single, central trunk as the tree matures and is often pruned in human agriculture to optimize tree density and ease of fruit harvest. At night, the leaflets close up.The tamarind does flower, though inconspicuously, with red and yellow elongated flowers. Flowers are 2.5 cm wide (one inch), five-petalled, borne in small racemes, and yellow with orange or red streaks. Buds are pink as the four sepals are pink and are lost when the flower blooms. Tamarind flowers The fruit is an indehiscent legume, sometimes called a pod, 12 to 15 cm (3 to 6 inches) in length, with a hard, brown shell. The fruit has a fleshy, juicy, acidulous pulp. It is mature when the flesh is coloured brown or reddish-brown. The tamarinds of Asia have longer pods containing six to 12 seeds, whereas African and West Indian varieties have short pods containing one to six seeds. The seeds are somewhat flattened, and glossy brown. The tamarind is best described as sweet and sour in taste, and is high in tartaric acid, sugar, B vitamins and, oddly for a fruit, calcium. As a tropical species, it is frost sensitive. The pinnate leaves with opposite leaflets give a billowing effect in the wind. Tamarind timber consists of hard, dark red heartwood and softer, yellowish sapwood. Tamarindus leaves and pod It is harvested by pulling the pod from its stalk. A mature tree may be capable of producing up to 175 kg (350 lb) of fruit per year. Veneer grafting, shield (T or inverted T) budding, and air layering may be used to propagate desirable selections. Such trees will usually fruit within three to four years if provided optimum growing conditions.

Tolu Balsam
  • Botanical: Myroxylon balsamum
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Tolu Balsam, Myroxylon balsamum, Balsam of Tolu, Balsam of Peru, Myroxylon, Perubalsam, Balsambäume, Cabreúva, Cabreuva, Myrocarpus fastigiatus, Quina, Balsamo
  • Old Use: medicinal, culinary
  • Aroma: balsamic, spicy, sweet, warm

Tolu Balsam

The trees are large, growing to 40 metres (130 ft) tall, with evergreen pinnate leaves 15 centimetres (5.9 in) long, with 5–13 leaflets. The flowers are white with yellow stamens, produced in racemes. The fruit is a pod 7–11 centimetres (2.8–4.3 in) long, containing a single seed.

The wood is dark brown, with a deep red heartwood. Natural oils grant it excellent decay resistance. In fact, it is also resistant to preservative treatment. Its specific gravity is 0.74 to 0.81.

Uva Ursi
  • Botanical: Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
  • Family: Ericaceae
  • Known as: kinnikinnick, pinemat manzanita, Echte Bärentraube, Immergrüne Bärentraube
  • Old Use: medical, industry

Uva Ursi

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi is a small procumbent woody groundcover shrub 5–30 cm high. The leaves are evergreen, remaining green for 1–3 years before falling. The fruit is a red berry. The leaves are shiny, small, and feel thick and stiff. They are alternately arranged on the stems. Undersides of leaves are lighter green than on the tops. New stems can be red if the plant is in full sun, but are green in shadier areas. Older stems are brown. In spring, they have white or pink flowers. Pure stands of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi can be extremely dense, with heights rarely taller than 6 inches. Erect branching twigs emerge from long flexible prostrate stems, which are produced by single roots. The trailing stems will layer, sending out small roots periodically. The finely textured velvety branches are initially white to pale green, becoming smooth and red-brown with maturity. The small solitary three scaled buds are dark brown. The simple leaves of this broadleaf evergreen are alternately arranged on branches. Each leaf is held by a twisted leaf stalk, vertically. The leathery dark green leaves are an inch long and have rounded tips tapering back to the base. In fall, the leaves begin changing from a dark green to a reddish-green to purple. Terminal clusters of small urn-shaped flowers bloom from May to June. The perfect flowers are white to pink, and bear round, fleshy or mealy, bright red to pink fruits called drupes. This smooth, glossy skinned fruit will range from 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. The fruit will persist on the plant into early winter. Each drupe contains 1 to 5 hard seeds, which need to be scarified and stratified prior to germination to reduce the seed coat and break embryo dormancy. There is an average of 40,900 cleaned seeds per pound.

Vijayasar
  • Botanical: Pterocarpus marsupium
  • Family: Fabaceae
  • Known as: Malabar Kino, Indian Kino Tree, Benga, Bijiayasal, Piasal, Venkai
  • Old Use: medical, industry
  • Aroma: sharp

Vijayasar

It is of moderate size to large tree. The height ranges from 15 to 30 meters. The stem is stout and crooked with widely spreading branches. The bark is thick and dark brown to grey in colour. Leaves are compound and imparipinnate. Leaflets are 5-7, coriaceous, oblong, obtuse, emarginated or even bilobed at the apex and glabrous on both surfaces. The petioles are round, smooth and waved from leaflet to leaflet, 5 or 6 inches long and there are no stipules. Panicles are terminal and very large; ramifications are bifarious, like the leaves. Peduncles and pedicals are round and a little downy. Bracts are small, caduceus, solitary below each division and subdivision of the panicle. The flowers are very numerous, white, with a small tinge of yellow. Vexillum is with a long, slender claw, very broad; sides reflexed, waved, curled and veined; keel is two pettled, adhering slightly for a little way near the middle, waved, etc., same as the vexillum. Stamens are 10, united near the base, but soon dividing into two parcels of 5 each; anthers are globose and 2-lobed. Ovary is oblong, pedicelled, hairy, generally 2-celled; cells are transverse and 1­seeded. Style is ascending. The legume, which is borne on a long petiole, is three-fourths orbicular, the upper remainder, which extends from the pedicel to the remainder of the style, is straight, the whole surrounded with a waved, veiny, downy, membraneous wing, swelled, rugose, woody in the center, where the seed is lodged and not opening; generally one but sometimes 2-celled. Seeds are single and reniform

Walnut
  • Botanical: Juglans nigra
  • Family: Juglandaceae
  • Known as: Walnut, Juglans, Juglans regia, Wallnuss, Wälsche Nuss, Welschnuss-Baum, Nussbaum, Christnuss, Steinnuss
  • Old Use: culinary; medicinal
  • Aroma: forest, earthy

Walnut

The tree grows to a height of 40 or 60 feet, with a large spreading top, and thick, massive stem. One accurately measured by Professor du Breuil, in Normandy, was upwards of 23 feet in circumference; and in some parts of France there are Walnut trees 300 years old, with stems of much greater thickness. In the southern parts of England the trees grow vigorously and bear abundantly, when not injured by late frosts in spring.

Witch Hazel
  • Botanical: Hamamelis virginiana
  • Family: Hamamelidaceae
  • Known as: Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, Virginische Zaubernuss, Amerikanische Zaubernuss, Hamamelis, Hexenhasel, Hopfenhainbuche, Virginia-Zaubernuss, Wünschelrute, Zauberhasel, Zauberhaselnuss, Zaubernuss
  • Old Use: medicinal

Witch Hazel

This shrub, long known in cultivation, consists of several crooked branching trunks from one root, 4 to 6 inches in diameter, 10 to 12 feet in height, with a smooth grey bark, leaves 3 to 5 inches long and about 3 inches wide, on short petioles, alternate, oval or obovate, acuminate, obliquely subcordate at the base, the margin crenate, dentate, scabrous, with raised spots underneath, pinnately veined and having stellate hairs.

Yerba Mate
  • Botanical: Ilex paraguariensis
  • Family: Aquifoliaceae
  • Known as: Yerba Mate, Ilex paraguariensis, Erva mate, Matestrauch, Mate-Teestrauch, Paraguay Tee
  • Old Use: culinary and medicinal use

Yerba Mate

Yerba mate, Ilex paraguariensis, begins as a shrub and then matures to a tree and can grow up to 15 metres (49 ft) tall. The leaves are evergreen, 7–11 cm long and 3–5.5 cm wide, with a serrated margin. The leaves are often called yerba (Spanish) or erva (Portuguese), both of which mean "herb". They contain caffeine (known in some parts of the world as mateine) and also contains related xanthine alkaloids and are harvested commercially.

The flowers are small, greenish-white, with four petals. The fruit is a red drupe 4–6 mm in diameter.

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