Purging Croton

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  • Botanical: Croton tiglium
  • Family: Euphorbiaceae
  • Hits: 967
Purging Croton

Botanical

Croton tiglium

Family

Euphorbiaceae

Known as

Jamaal Gota, Crotonöl

Old Use

medical

Parts Used

seed

Medicinal

rheumatism, vomiting

Muscle & Joints

gout, rheumatism

Mind & Nerves

neuralgia

Respiratory System

bronchitis

Stomach & Intestinal

constipation, vomiting

Description

A small tree or shrub with a few spreading branches bearing alternate petiolate leaves which are ovate, acuminate, serrate, smooth, dark green on upper surface paler beneath and furnished with two glands at base.

Flowers in erect terminal racemes, scarcely as long as the leaf, the lower female, upper male, straw-coloured petals.

Fruit a smooth capsule of the size of a filbert, three cells, each containing a single seed; these seeds resemble castor beans in size and structure, oblong, rounded at the extremities with two faces; the kernel or endosperm is yellowish brown and abounds in oil.

The oil is obtained by expression from the seeds previously deprived of the shell.

Properties & Uses

A powerful drastic purgative, in large doses apt to excite vomiting and severe griping pains capable of producing fatal effects. It acts with great rapidity, frequently evacuating the bowels in less than an hour. The dose is very small; a drop placed on the tongue of a comatose patient will generally operate It is chiefly employed in cases of obstinate constipation, often being successful where other drugs have failed. Applied externally, it produces inflammation of the skin attended with pustular eruption, and has been used as a counter-irritant in rheumatism gout, neuralgia, bronchitis, etc.

Cautions

Must always be used with the greatest care and should never be given to children or pregnant women.

Constituents

Croton oil consists chiefly of the glycerides of stearic, palmitic, myristic, lauric and oleic acids; there are also present in the form of glycerin ethers the more volatile acids as formic, acetic, isobutyric and isovalerianic acids. The active principle is believed to be Crotonic acid, which is freely soluble in alcohol.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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